Whole Leaf Tobacco

Importing WLT cigar kits into Canada

Rectifier

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Hi guys, haven't been around this forum for a long time as I've just been into smoking VA flakes lately, and I'll honestly admit I can't produce anything as good as I can buy.

However some friends and I were lamenting the fact that we hadn't enjoyed a good cigar in ages, and decided that we want to try to hand-roll some cigars this summer. WLT has the cigar blend kits which look like an easy way to give it a try with a fairly guaranteed result.

My question is, are the fillers pre-prepared in any way that would make them "processed" tobacco or are these kits still 100% whole leaf when it comes to import duties?

Thanks!
 

Rectifier

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Thanks! I think I'll order the Melodioso Cremosa, mild-medium Dominicans should be a smoke that everyone can enjoy. Though Azucarado Oscuro also sounds excellent... maybe I'll just do both, that's a lot of cigars for not much money.

Pics for sure though I doubt I'll be sharing my first stick... maybe it'll look so funny it's worth sharing though :)

Molds look pretty expensive for a guy just trying it out, so I'm planning to start by trying to hand roll these like Bob does in https://fairtradetobacco.com/threads/hand-rolling-a-fat-cigar-no-mold-no-glue.7944/
 

CobGuy

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Both of those kits were among my first foray into rolling and I enjoyed them.
I also use no molds … a fairly snug double binder is all you really need and even the wrapper is optional.
Even the glue is optional and I often skip it. No Rules! LOL

~Darin
 

Rectifier

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Cool. There sure are lots of nice hand rolls on "Pics of your sticks" as well as molded cigars, lots of inspiration.

As someone who has never rolled cigars, what is the advantage to using the chaveta over a regular blade? Everyone seems to have one!
When I watch videos I see it being rocked over the leaf where I would have expected to simply draw a slice with a sharp knife. It looks like more work, to be honest. Less chance of tearing?
 

CobGuy

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A fairly new (ie. still sharp) pizza cutter works really well too.
Again … no rules. LOL

~Darin
 

ArizonaDave

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Yes, it's still "Whole leaf". I'd recommend a couple kits. Try small tester cigars, and keep a cigar blend notebook. That way, you'll be able to hone in to your personal tastes quicker. The kits are great the way they are, although with two or more kits, you'll have more combinations to choose from. I find that they taste way better than most store bought, so much so, I don't by store bought anymore.
 

Rectifier

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I didn't consider it at first, but it seems pretty obvious when you put it that way that all the leaf from a couple different kits can be combined to make a wide array of cigars. I was thinking of doing just one kit in case it didn't work out very good, but if the cigars are better than store bought... it's a no brainer to buy two and mix and match them to make something to my personal taste.

I'm definitely planning on rolling smaller cigars anyways, one of the reasons I was interested in home rolling. I was thinking to try some gorditos, a short fat cigar that can be enjoyed while cruising around in the truck checking crops. It's hard to find a whole hour to dedicate to a cigar or pipe this time of year!
 

Rectifier

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I have the two kits that I mentioned on order and am pretty excited for them to show up. Also watched a video using a pizza cutter... it looks like the way to go!

Saskatchewan is in a terrible drought right now so I will probably have to work fast to keep things in case. Current humidity here is 15%. Yikes! I crack my jars of pipe tobacco just long enough to snatch out enough for a smoke and seal them up in seconds!

I suspect to get these cigars to a proper humidity level after rolling I will have to build a more traditional humidor with a big wet sponge inside. Otherwise I will chew through as much money in Boveda packs as I have spent on the tobacco.
 

ArizonaDave

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I didn't consider it at first, but it seems pretty obvious when you put it that way that all the leaf from a couple different kits can be combined to make a wide array of cigars. I was thinking of doing just one kit in case it didn't work out very good, but if the cigars are better than store bought... it's a no brainer to buy two and mix and match them to make something to my personal taste.

I'm definitely planning on rolling smaller cigars anyways, one of the reasons I was interested in home rolling. I was thinking to try some gorditos, a short fat cigar that can be enjoyed while cruising around in the truck checking crops. It's hard to find a whole hour to dedicate to a cigar or pipe this time of year!
Smaller cigars are great, so are the gorditos. I make one I call a "Trumpeto", because it's shaped like an ice cream cone or trumpet. I take the tip clipping and the foot clipping, and put them at the tip basically, or stagger them. A Gordito would be easy enough too.
 

Rectifier

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I got my tobacco and it didn't even get any attention from customs. I was expecting to pay the dollar or two that I legally owed on unprocessed tobacco. Well, can't complain! Looks like nice leaf, can't wait to roll it up.
 
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