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Kentucky Burley Prep?

stdly

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"Back by request. Burley is a major component in most cigarette and pipe blends, but because of the amount of preparation that is required to make it palatable, we recommend learning all you can before attempting to use it. If you do not want to go through all of the preparation time, you can use raw Burley as a “condiment” by adding 5% -10% to your blends."
WLT

Does anybody have a link to the prep of this Burley I would like to try it as a condiment or more.
 
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deluxestogie

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Historically, burley is air-cured, aged a few months to a year, then used for commercial cigarette production. In commercial settings, burley is sometimes toasted, and always treated with assorted chemicals.

I have made cigars entirely from air-cured burley, as well as blended with cigar varieties for a cigar. During the winter immediately after harvest, burley is relatively raw. It often ages considerably by late spring or early summer of the season after harvest.

That being said, I now always kiln burley prior to use. Why? Because kilning completes practically all aging that can be expected from air-cured burley. That's it. I kiln it. Sometimes I cook burley (kilned or non-kilned) into Cavendish, for pipe blending.

So, if purchased burley seems a bit raw, allow it to age for six months. If you have a kiln, then simply kiln the burley. You can still toast it if you like, or cook up some Cavendish. Many of my pipe blends use kilned burley and/or burley Cavendish. I've also perique-processed burley, and ended up with some nice perique.

Bob
 

stdly

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Historically, burley is air-cured, aged a few months to a year, then used for commercial cigarette production. In commercial settings, burley is sometimes toasted, and always treated with assorted chemicals.

I have made cigars entirely from air-cured burley, as well as blended with cigar varieties for a cigar. During the winter immediately after harvest, burley is relatively raw. It often ages considerably by late spring or early summer of the season after harvest.

That being said, I now always kiln burley prior to use. Why? Because kilning completes practically all aging that can be expected from air-cured burley. That's it. I kiln it. Sometimes I cook burley (kilned or non-kilned) into Cavendish, for pipe blending.

So, if purchased burley seems a bit raw, allow it to age for six months. If you have a kiln, then simply kiln the burley. You can still toast it if you like, or cook up some Cavendish. Many of my pipe blends use kilned burley and/or burley Cavendish. I've also perique-processed burley, and ended up with some nice perique.

Bob
Info overload thanks so much Bob.
I do not have a kiln, so will it age in the vac packs we receive from WLT or do I need to do more to make it age correctly?
 

stdly

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I can't find a good description of the leaf is it like Maryland 609 thin leaf lots of volume per weight?
 

Knucklehead

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I can't find a good description of the leaf is it like Maryland 609 thin leaf lots of volume per weight?
It’s thicker than Maryland, thinner than dark air. In terms of thickness, I would compare it to Virginia flue cured.
 

Knucklehead

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Info overload thanks so much Bob.
I do not have a kiln, so will it age in the vac packs we receive from WLT or do I need to do more to make it age correctly?
The last burley I bought from WLT was several years ago. At that time the leaf was aged and ready to go. This is a new batch and could be from a recent harvest so it could be ready to smoke now or it may need more aging. You could try it now or wait for a review from a member once someone tries the new batch. I have loads from growing and stashing WLT leaf but burley comprises 20% of my cigarette blend.
The leaf will continue to age as long as there is a little moisture present. I would try some first to see how it tastes. (Unless you wait for a review) If it needs aging, put it back and give it a spritz of water occasionally so it continues to age. Completely drying out stops the aging until you give it a little moisture, then the aging resumes. I treat burley just like all other leaf but for me, it must be aged beyond that raw stage or it tastes like mowed grass.
 

stdly

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The last burley I bought from WLT was several years ago. At that time the leaf was aged and ready to go. This is a new batch and could be from a recent harvest so it could be ready to smoke now or it may need more aging. You could try it now or wait for a review from a member once someone tries the new batch. I have loads from growing and stashing WLT leaf but burley comprises 20% of my cigarette blend.
The leaf will continue to age as long as there is a little moisture present. I would try some first to see how it tastes. (Unless you wait for a review) If it needs aging, put it back and give it a spritz of water occasionally so it continues to age. Completely drying out stops the aging until you give it a little moisture, then the aging resumes. I treat burley just like all other leaf but for me, it must be aged beyond that raw stage or it tastes like mowed grass.
All good info thanks a lot.
 

stdly

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I ordered a pound and a pound of Krumovgrad B2 two I haven't tried blending into my pipe tobacco yet.
I only discovered this forum and whole leaf tobacco back in May and at 62 years old I am a new to all this and loving it, the cost savings and the quality is something a year ago I had no clue.
Sure wish I had found this forum a long time ago, thanks again all the members.
 

stdly

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Coming to a pipe blending thread near you on Thursday (3 DEC). And there are others in the works.

Bob
Anticipating these blends.
Have you tried the Krumovgrad T2, I wait for a review on this one as well.
I am surprised how few the reviews are on the WLT site considering how they get talked about on this forum?
 

deluxestogie

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I did review T2, but the site automatically erased my lengthy review because of my mistake in entering my email. Not the most user-friendly interface. Opportunity reviews but once.

In short, the T2 and B2 are fairly similar. The T2 is a bit fuller in body, and somewhat less floral.

Bob
 

stdly

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I did review T2, but the site automatically erased my lengthy review because of my mistake in entering my email. Not the most user-friendly interface. Opportunity reviews but once.

In short, the T2 and B2 are fairly similar. The T2 is a bit fuller in body, and somewhat less floral.

Bob
Thanks for that.
Maybe other people have had the same issues as you and that is why the review count is low?
When ever I do a reveiw or post more than 4 lines I use MS word and post it when I am sober. LOL
 
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