Buy Tobacco Leaf Online | Whole Leaf Tobacco

Kooky's 2022 Noob Grow

Kooky

Member
Joined
Apr 20, 2022
Messages
20
Points
13
Location
Florida
I do my best to utilize dry leaves, I find that the leaves can absorb humidity and rain quite well, which lets what's underneath it remain moist for relatively long. The problem really has been I believe the root development of the tobacco plants, having transplanted them all recently. Their roots were nearly nonexistent. Perhaps I transplanted them too early. The sweltering midday sun also had an effect, I believe in order to plant them outside in the garden when I did, I need them to be larger and more established. Now that FL weather has cooled a bit, they'd probably thrive where they were right now.

My tobacco has been growing for quite a while. Due to the sandy, poor soil, I decided to switch them to pots until they grew larger. Florida has extremely weird weather, it will be bone dry and humid for 3 weeks and then we will get torrential downpours 24/7 for multiple days.

With that said, the plants are "old", and for their age I'm sure they should be larger, however, they are growing and not dead.

My question is, some of the bottom leaves are turning yellow and brown, usually this happens towards the tail end of their life, correct? Well, in the meantime, should I prune these leaves? Is it worth attempting to cure and smoke them?

Regards

Edit: another major problem with that actually is that I have to wait until he plants are larger to identify them! this batch was an absolute mess and everything got out of order, but I've learned a lot. No way should I try to smoke the leaves right now, some of them are the high-nicotine ceremonial Native American varieties...

IMG_0532.JPG

IMG_0528.JPG

IMG_0529.JPG
 
Last edited:

deluxestogie

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
May 25, 2011
Messages
21,647
Points
113
Location
near Blacksburg, VA
Leaves senesce from the bottom of the stalk to the top. Once they begin to yellow, you can prime them. Nicotine levels tend to be lowest in the lowest leaves, and highest in the uppermost leaves. Once cured and finished, all of them should be smokable.

Bob
 

Kooky

Member
Joined
Apr 20, 2022
Messages
20
Points
13
Location
Florida
Are tobacco plants supposed to be growing in pots? My in-ground tobacco tends to shed its bottom leaves at about 8 weeks post transplant.

Bob
I guess not, but they were wilting heavily when I ground and had stunted growth, hence the move back to a pot. Not sure where I should’ve gone with it.
 

deluxestogie

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
May 25, 2011
Messages
21,647
Points
113
Location
near Blacksburg, VA
Differing growing conditions make it challenging to say what should be expected. I have grown tobacco in pots. Its growth patterns and timing differ from the same varieties grown in the garden bed during the same season. I get what I get. On the rare occasions that I've transplanted from garden to pot (e.g. seed head not yet matured at the time of an early frost) the plants have lounged about indoors through the winter, behaving strangely.

Bob

EDIT: Keep in mind that tobacco is a sub-tropical perennial. If it never freezes, it lives forever—sort of.
 

Kooky

Member
Joined
Apr 20, 2022
Messages
20
Points
13
Location
Florida
Differing growing conditions make it challenging to say what should be expected. I have grown tobacco in pots. Its growth patterns and timing differ from the same varieties grown in the garden bed during the same season. I get what I get. On the rare occasions that I've transplanted from garden to pot (e.g. seed head not yet matured at the time of an early frost) the plants have lounged about indoors through the winter, behaving strangely.

Bob

EDIT: Keep in mind that tobacco is a sub-tropical perennial. If it never freezes, it lives forever—sort of.
Well then I won’t give up on them being in South FL… will see where it heads.
 
Top