Whole Leaf Tobacco

Latakia British Columbia style

DGBAMA

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I would think that "Curing" indicates starting with green leaf, in a continuous process until done.......flue, fire, air, sun.

Processes that start with cured leaf are just that, "processes"; used to alter the smoking flavor or properties of the leaf. Perique, cavendish, smoking, etc.
 

DGBAMA

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DGBAMA smoked some Silver River in his smoker at the same time he was cooking meat. It had a very wonderful, unique flavor, unlike any fire cured I had ever smoked. At first I attributed this to the variety, but it could very well have been the meat and fat that imparted the flavor.
It was put on after the food, but with the same fire still burning in the smoker. I actually never considered that the food which had been cooked may have impacted the finished flavor. Interesting thought. Either way, I need to do some more; it was good.
 

Brown Thumb

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It was put on after the food, but with the same fire still burning in the smoker. I actually never considered that the food which had been cooked may have impacted the finished flavor. Interesting thought. Either way, I need to do some more; it was good.
What kind of food was cooked to achieve this tasty Baccy.
Gas grill or charcoal or wood for fuel source?
Thanks, BT
 

chillardbee

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I like your way of thinking BAMA. In articals I've been reading, some mention they start by suncuring and others either fail to mention it or just get straight to the 'firecuring' process of it. But since there is mention in more than a few of the articles of a prior method of curing, mostly sun curing with the varieties being mostly oriental, I think it would be better to think of the making of latakia as 'process' too. The thing I like about that link I posted is that, being it is a research paper, I believe they have done a lot better research into the processing of the various types of produced latakia and I would depend on there info a bit more than the info past down and often being distorted from misunderstandings or myths by some people who wrote articles without doing any actual research into it.
 

deluxestogie

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Will,
Very nice link.
Leffingwell said:
The Oriental tobacco type used for production of Cyprian Latakia tobacco is generally from “Smyrna” type seed. Anecdotally it is mentioned that in addition to hardwoods, some pine and aromatic shrubs and woods such as “myrtle” are used in the smoke-curing process.
We initially suspected that one of the main aromatic woods used was Juniperus oxycedrus, as the exotic, tarry aroma of Latakia has a similarity to the empyreumatic Cade oil produced by the destructive distillation of Juniperus oxycedrus (10,11-12). While J. oxycedrus contains nearly all of the sesquiterpenoids found in our analyses, the absence of cedrol, humulene oxide II, cedrenes and thujopsene in the Cyprian Latakia tobacco headspace would tend to indicate that it is not a major aromatic wood used (11-14). However, as the amounts of these sesquiterpenoids in J. oxycedrus, J. excelsa and J. phoenicea (which are all present in Cyprus) can vary dramatically by species, subspecies and location, their possible use to some degree cannot be totally dismissed.

It has been reported that the Mastic shrub (Pistacia lentiscus) is primarily used in the smoke generation for Cyprian Latakia tobacco (15). The following formula, based on this report, may approximate the shrubs and woods used for the smoke-curing process.
  • Mastic (Pistacia lentiscus) 90%
  • Myrtle - Myrtus communis 4%
  • Cypress - Cupressus sempervirens 4%
  • Stone Pine (Pinus pinea or Pinus pinaster) 4%
  • Other 1%
Virtually all of the terpenoids and sesquiterpenoids found in our headspace analyses are also known constituents of Pistacia lentiscus which leads credence to Mastic being a primary smoke contributor. Pistacia lentiscus not only grows wild in Cyprus but is also commercially cultivated.
Following the smoke curing process, the tobacco is usually bulked in large piles of bales which allows fermentation to proceed over a period of 3-6 months (16). Fermentation is said to improve the flavor.

http://www.leffingwell.com/download/latakia2013.pdf
I'll also post this info in the Latakia-specific thread.

Bob
 

DGBAMA

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What kind of food was cooked to achieve this tasty Baccy.
Gas grill or charcoal or wood for fuel source?
Thanks, BT
After removing a pork shoulder from the smoker, mix of oak and mesquite, a hand of medium/low case silver river was put in its place and allowed to"smoke"for about 6 hours.
 

chillardbee

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It's been almost a year and I was just getting the smoker ready a round of smoking when I looked in and last years leaves that I mentioned at the beginning of this post were still hanging in there, all last winter and all through the summer. The smell is right out og this world.
 

Chicken

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In my area I got access to pine...pecan...cypress...oak...cedar...pear...

I'm on the fence about the pine..but on the other hand for a "piney" flavour..it may be something to consider..

My plans are to construct me a fire curing set up this season..

I may experiment with each wood individually...and eventually do a mixture of all the woods mentioned....
 

ProfessorPangloss

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Same deal here in Kentucky. I could log a truckload of cedar from a friend's horse farm and be doing them a favor. If I ever get a wood-burning fireplace insert, I'll be doing that. I'm interested in the denouement of this whole cluster-experiment, and if I ever get around to building my masonry outdoor pizza oven this summer, I'll want to join in the fun. If my leaf survives, that is.
 

Knucklehead

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Same deal here in Kentucky. I could log a truckload of cedar from a friend's horse farm and be doing them a favor. If I ever get a wood-burning fireplace insert, I'll be doing that. I'm interested in the denouement of this whole cluster-experiment, and if I ever get around to building my masonry outdoor pizza oven this summer, I'll want to join in the fun. If my leaf survives, that is.
Evergreens such as pine and cedar will really gum up a flue and become a fire hazard.
http://www.ehow.com/about_5426072_can-burn-pine-fireplace.html
 

burge

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I have been reading the making of latakia and one thing that would kind of make sense to me would be to burn peat. I have never tried latakia but that would make sense to me.
 

deluxestogie

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I'm afraid that I fail to make any connection between the article cited (demonstrating that peat from the Black Sea coast of northern Turkey was formed with primarily terrestrial plant material) and the manufacture of Latakia.

Smoke some Latakia tobacco. Burn some peat. Sniff.

Bob
 

BigBonner

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I have not seen it mentioned on here as to firing tobacco . To fire cure KY Dark Fire , Hardwoods are used Oak , Hickory etc , But no cedar or pine is used . Slabs and sawdust are used from sawmills in the area .
Placing slabs of wood on the floor of a tobacco barn and pile sawdust on top of those slabs . Moisten the sawdust keeps the fire from getting out of control and makes moist smoldering smoke that coats the tobacco . You may have to keep adding water to the smoldering pile according to how the fire is burning . You don't want to see flams or at least very little flames when firing . I almost burnt my barn down that I fired my tobacco in .
Tobacco is hung and let wilt to a yellow stage before it is fired and is not cured or allowed to cure too much before it is fired up . Letting tobacco cure too much before it is fired will not allow the leaves to take in as much smoke .
 

burge

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I have not had the tobacco but in reading through the posts peat smokes and gives that dark black colour. The peat is unique in Turkey. Just a thought. Peat is all the sticks pine needles etc super moist and could make a fire cured leaf.
 

DistillingJim

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Peat is good for whiskey. I imagine it would be a good experiment to try fire curing some tobacco with it although I suspect it would be quite different to Latakia or Dark Fired.
 

deluxestogie

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Peat is good for whiskey.
That is an excellent point that I had forgotten. [Scotch! The Story of Whisky. BBC series in 3 parts: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b07z8644]

Around here, though, peat is available as a potting and growing ingredient, to which a "wetting agent" and some form of fertilizer have usually been added. So it might be a challenge to find actual, pure peat.

Bob
 

DistillingJim

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It's not an uncommon ingredient here. I would volunteer to undertake an experiment but the area I live in is fairly densely populated amd I'm not sure how firing up a smoker for 30 days in a row would be welcomed by my neighbours.
 
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