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let's see your veggie garden {pics} 2021

msmith86

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Picking through some things today in the garden area, and our most recent emergency foster placement is glued to me as my new sidekick, so she helped pick jalapenos, Independence Day heirloom tomatoes, and cucumbers. Also did my usual extreme pruning on some that were turning into bushes. I then went down the back 40 to dump turkey manure/pine flakes in the compost and got distracted by the blackberries along the woods behind my shop. The tomatoes and cucumbers are top notch flavor so far.
 

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Knucklehead

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Picking through some things today in the garden area, and our most recent emergency foster placement is glued to me as my new sidekick, so she helped pick jalapenos, Independence Day heirloom tomatoes, and cucumbers. Also did my usual extreme pruning on some that were turning into bushes. I then went down the back 40 to dump turkey manure/pine flakes in the compost and got distracted by the blackberries along the woods behind my shop. The tomatoes and cucumbers are top notch flavor so far.
Your little girl is precious. I’m sure she enjoyed being outside. The veggies are in good hands now. (y)
 

msmith86

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Your little girl is precious. I’m sure she enjoyed being outside. The veggies are in good hands now. (y)
She got here at dinnertime last Friday scared out of her mind, next county, with only the filthy clothes she had on, and she's 5. That's why I haven't been on here in a week or so. It was an emergency removal of 4 siblings from the Gettysburg area, all different last names. My wife and I are a foster/resource family under an unrestricted state license as we specialize in mental and developmental disabilities, and severe trauma/abuse for almost 14 years now. Unfortunately she was victim to every kind of abuse you can't even imagine, and it's obvious she never had a father-figure in her life by the way she is glued to only me. She has to help me with everything, and know what I'm doing and where I am at all times. Everything here is exciting to her, she has been inside a horrible house basically without supervision 90% of the time for 5 years. She's enjoying the animals, the pool, and gardening for sure.
 

deluxestogie

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Okay. It's not my veggie garden. It's my front porch corner post. I have two mini-kabocha squash plants growing from a single Folger's coffee tub. Each plant currently is attempting to produce a single squash. The nearest vine has grown over the railing, and sports its fruit on the dependent portion of the vine. I have to water these generously every day.

Bob
 

deluxestogie

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With my hungry neighbors eating my beans, this season's bounty has been limited. I had a total of 1 handful of green beans (Italian and purple combined), and two miniscule carrots. Not really enough for more than one serving.



I cut the tiny carrots into thin coins, and the beans into 1" segments. These were tossed into a plate of seafood breading, and fried until crispy in ¼" of oil.

Bob
 

ChinaVoodoo

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With my hungry neighbors eating my beans, this season's bounty has been limited. I had a total of 1 handful of green beans (Italian and purple combined), and two miniscule carrots. Not really enough for more than one serving.



I cut the tiny carrots into thin coins, and the beans into 1" segments. These were tossed into a plate of seafood breading, and fried until crispy in ¼" of oil.

Bob
https://www.reddit.com/r/TikTokCringe/comments/oj4h9t View: https://www.reddit.com/r/TikTokCringe/comments/oj4h9t/this_is_the_funniest_thing_ive_ever_seen/?utm_source=share&utm_medium=mweb
 

deluxestogie

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Any winter squash or pumpkin that has matured on the vine can be brought in from the garden, and immediately prepared for eating. The purpose of sun-curing after picking is to not only improve the storage life--by thickening the skin and hardening the stem, but also to increase the sugar content of the flesh--much like a pear ripening.

You can certainly allow the squash to develop a fully dry stem while still on the vine, as you may see in a pumpkin patch in October. But for a home grower, the squash, like ripening tobacco, is at increased risk of damage, the longer it remains out in the elements.

Although I've sun-cured these Delicata squash on a sunny shelf in my enclosed back porch, my gigantic North Georgia Candy Roasters will have to sun-cure on my front porch--and I'll be on the lookout for bugs. More subtle than the desiccation of the stem is the alteration of skin color. In the above photo, you may be able to appreciate that the squash on the left has acquired a slightly yellower skin color, while the one on the right remains a bright white.

Bob
 

deluxestogie

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If this exact variety of pepper were growing in the Espelette region of Basque Country, it would be called "Piment d'Espelette". They've been grown there since 1523. But that name is copyrighted, patented, registered and trademarked. (You would think that, after 500 years, it would be out of copyright.)

It is classed as a "hot" pepper, but is described as only mildly hot, with a more smoky and aromatic character. We'll see. I haven't tasted one yet. My plan is to dry most of them, then grind them (without the seeds) into a powder for seasoning.

The seed is available from Terroir Seeds:

Bob
 

skychaser

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Anyone ever seen this before? These are a friends peppers who lives about 150 miles west of me. I've seen Early Blight on tomatoes that looked a lot like this on the stem end. But not this bad, Early Blight is caused by excessively cool and wet conditions early in the year. But it has been anything but cool or wet here this year. Where he lives it is always hotter and dryer than where I am. And its 102 f here right now.

diseased peppers.jpg
 

deluxestogie

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Looks like blossom end rot.

"We often see blossom end rot occur on hot and sunny days. Two reasons explain this trend. First, water stress. Calcium must be moved to the fruit with water, if there is not enough water, it is hard for calcium to reach the bottom of tomato fruit, the furthest end from where water is taken. Another reason is that fruit are fast expanding under hot and sunny days."

Bob
 

deluxestogie

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Hmmm. What veggie should I eat today?



It's just me here. I've pretty much given up on canning and tomato sauce making. Last summer, I had three runted tomatoes--total. This year, it's been wait...wait...wait. Yay! Finally a nice tomato. Then the plants exploded with lovely fruit. This is Big Beef, which is resistant to an alphabet soup of tomato diseases.

I ate 3 large tomatoes yesterday. When I cooked some unpeeled, chunked tomatoes into a can of black beans, and simmered for several hours, it turned itself into a wonderful, extra-rich black bean soup. I think a giant pot of chili may be in my future.

Bob
 

deluxestogie

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Basque Peppers

Since the Basque Peppers are hot and fibrous, and have very little flesh, I've decided to dry them all, then grind them to powder. Below, about a dozen peppers have been de-seeded, and sliced in half. They are in a lattice 1020 tray, on a wire shelf on my enclosed back porch.



To keep any insects off of them, until they have dried a bit, I've covered the lattice tray with a section of Agribon AG-15.



Once they are as dry as possible, I will chunk them in the food processor, then mill them to powder in a coffee grinder.

Bob
 
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