Whole Leaf Tobacco

let's see your veggie garden {pics}

GreenDragon

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2018
Messages
1,212
Points
113
Location
Austin, TX
I’ll post this here for grins and giggles. The wife took over all my tobacco beds this year for garden space. So this year I’m practicing “crop rotation”. I’ve got one tobacco plant that is a volunteer on my patio by the grill. It’s nestled in the Bee Balm that grows in the grout lines. Unfortunately it’s days are numbered as I weed eat the Bee Balm on a semi regular basis to keep it in check.

267F7427-2F3E-4677-8CB2-93B662204C9D.jpeg
 

MadFarmer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 7, 2019
Messages
151
Points
63
Location
Arlington. TX
Arg. I didn't mean for that to post! I'm low on bulk 'browns' to compost. No more leaves on the ground, so adding all the summer fruit remains attracts rats something fierce. I learned this the hard way my first year.

Also, haven't seen the neighborhood possum in some time - hope he's okay.
 

deluxestogie

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
May 25, 2011
Messages
16,462
Points
113
Location
near Blacksburg, VA


My weather was actually sunny, warm and dry all day. In late afternoon, I went out to dig my garlic. This is several weeks later than I wanted to harvest it. Even so, the ground was impressively dense and unyielding. I ended up with a blister on my hand. The garlic slowly came out with gobs of not mud, but heavy, dark dirt clinging to each head. I didn't count them, but I have somewhere between 25 and 30 heads of garlic from this November planting.

The timing was fine for the hard-neck Slovenian Anka garlic (visible in the photo), which I've propagated for a number of years now, after initially receiving some from @rainmax. I had cut their curling scapes about 10 days ago (and battered and fried them). The timing was late, unfortunately, for my soft-neck Czech Broadleaf garlic (hidden in the photo). A number of the heads had already split into separate cloves. Those split ones will get used, but those heads won't be braided for hanging in the kitchen.

I've left them all in the mesh tray, on the floor of my curing shed to wilt a bit in the shade. [Translation: I was so exhausted and wilted from the heat and the difficult digging and the tedious knocking off of dense dirt, as well as the trudging over deep grass, that I wasn't about to lengthen the time until I could guzzle some cold water, and sit directly in front of the fan on my porch.]

In a few days, I'll tie bunches of entire stalks, and hang them to cure for a month in the shed.

Bob
 

tullius

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 16, 2019
Messages
612
Points
93
Location
NE Ohio
I had cut their curling scapes about 10 days ago (and battered and fried them)
Garlic scapes are highly underrated. One of these days someone will put them on a trendy menu in a bloated city that doesn't grow much besides concrete and criminality, and they'll blow up.
 

deluxestogie

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
May 25, 2011
Messages
16,462
Points
113
Location
near Blacksburg, VA
With garlic scapes, there is a limited segment of stem that is not woody, located just below the blossom head. The blossom head itself, as well as the little, pointy end can't be easily chewed, no matter how much it is cooked. I use a sharp knife blade against the lower stem to test for tenderness (in a fashion similar to working my way up a stalk of asparagus), until it easily sinks in. I've also pickled them, and found the same result--just that several inches below the blossom head is tender. But the aroma of cooking them, and the taste is really hard to beat.

Bob
 
Top