Whole Leaf Tobacco

let's see your veggie garden {pics}

Jvergen

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OK so I know this should go some place else but it's in my garden as just a learning experience, yellow twist bud I got from big bonner, there are other plants spread in other beds, just for fun. IMG_20200713_103819114_HDR.jpg
 

Oldfella

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OK so I know this should go some place else but it's in my garden as just a learning experience, yellow twist bud I got from big bonner, there are other plants spread in other beds, just for fun. View attachment 31652
Weeellll, you can chew tobacco so I guess it fits the criteria. Had to get that in.
Oldfella
 

plantdude

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Another exercise in what not to do - I made a half hearted attempt at companion planting a few tobacco plants among some corn, cucumber, squash, and sunflower. My hopes were the tobacco plants might keep down the squash borers a little. Nothing in the cucurbit family survives the squash borers in our area for long unless they are sprayed with pesticide. image.jpeg

The only ground prep was laying a very thin layer of compost down (no tilling in our hard clay) and covering it with a layer of cardboard to keep the grass down. I was curious to see how our plain soil would do even though I had a pretty good idea of what would happen. The cucumbers grown in the background of the pic are growing in an open bottomed planter box filled with compost. The cucumbers have been productive, the 2 sunflowers mehh, the corn nada (as expected), the squash with nothing yet and one plant killed by borers. Summary tobacco companion planting didn't seem to deter borers and soil prep helps... I should have bet money on that outcome.
My other garden is in the top left corner (not very visible) The tomatoes produced mediocre early in the season and are starting to cut out now and get diseased (like every year by now). The bell peppers have been doing ok and the hot peppers are starting to produce. Other herbs, tomatillos, squash , carrots and the obligatory tobacco plant also inhabit the garden. The first batch of garden salsa was made last week (onions and cilantro were unfortunately store bought). We are a long way from self sufficiency, but live about a mile away from Walmart:)
 

plantdude

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Adding garden pics...
Carrots basil and a few small Serrano peppers.image.jpeg

The obligatory tobacco plant (Florida Sumatra) in the garden.image.jpeg

Bell and non-hot peppers. image.jpeg

Tomatoes, peppers and tomatillos. The tomatoes have to be picked early (light orange) or the birds get them (hence no ripe ones in the garden). They also get diseased by this point in the season regardless of the variety grown and production begins falling off. Beefsteak faired better than early girl this year. The tomatillos and hot peppers eventually take over the dying tomato space towards the end of summer. The tomatillos reseed themselves every year and help distract the flea beetles form the young pepper plants. Bok choy, radish, spinach, cilantro and peas were planted in early spring and have long since been replaced.
image.jpegimage.jpeg

Back to the cucumbers and a sunflower.image.jpegimage.jpeg
 

deluxestogie

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tomatoes...get diseased by this point in the season regardless of the variety grown
The specific tomato variety named Big Beef is the most disease resistant tomato I've found. Though it eventually manages to find a willing pathogen, they did much better for me (actually, too much better) than any other variety. When I planted enough of them to account for usual disease losses, I ended up with peck baskets full (as in, "Here comes Bob again, trying to give away all of his extra zucchini.") of beautiful, beefsteak tomatoes.

Bob
 

plantdude

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The specific tomato variety named Big Beef is the most disease resistant tomato I've found. Though it eventually manages to find a willing pathogen, they did much better for me (actually, too much better) than any other variety. When I planted enough of them to account for usual disease losses, I ended up with peck baskets full (as in, "Here comes Bob again, trying to give away all of his extra zucchini.") of beautiful, beefsteak tomatoes.

Bob
Thanks for the tip, I'll try to find that variety next year. That should be indeterminate if it is a beefsteak type.

I love home made salsa but my tomatoes are usually struggling or done just as my hot peppers start coming in strong. I try going with an indeterminate variety in hopes that it can out grow the disease enough to set a little fruit later in summer when the peppers are producing. If that doesn't work I have to resort to tomatillos and making green salsa.
 

plantdude

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Border collie x Great Pyrenees x chow mix (according to the DNA test). She’s a rescue. Also, little known fact: some cats also like cantaloupe. It has the same active compound as cat nip. We had a cat that loved it.
Neat, I never knew that about cats and cantaloupe.
So the dog is a proud descent of cannis lupus:) There is something to be said for mixed breeds sometimes, almost seems to mellow out the inadvertent bad traits that gets selected for in purebreds.
We used to have an Aussie before (and after) we had kids. She was quite the dog, they are an amazing breed. She was our test child before we actually started having kids. Kind of funny how young couples do that and never realize that's what they are doing. I used to work for a couple that we're going through a divorce, they actually had custody battles over who got the dog and for how long:)
 

deluxestogie

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These cukes are producing in the garden bed. This one, in the hanging pot, is just now fruiting, since it gets only a little direct sunlight each day. And we seem to be having an abundance of sunlight. H-19 is parthenocarpic, so, if it is prevented from being pollinated, it produces seedless cukes. The leaves are only about 2" across--perfect for containers and porch veggies. Those out in the garden are already being harvested.

https://www.johnnyseeds.com/vegetables/cucumbers/pickling-cucumbers/h-19-little-leaf-organic-cucumber-seed-331G.html



Bob
 
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