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Mad Science experiment #1 Beerique

ChinaVoodoo

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I believe pichia anomala like saccharomyces creates an acidic environment during fermentation. The reason why it creates an alkaline smoke is because the carbohydrate level of the leaf is significantly decreased. When sugar is burned, it makes the smoke itself acidic. Glucose for example creates formic acid when burned. This process is nearly eliminated.
 

CobGuy

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Steve kindly sent me some samples of his Beerique and I've got to say he's onto something here. While not becoming "perique" in the sense of what's expected, the process did endow the leaf with some fruity, floral and musty notes that would otherwise not be present. It also had an almost creaminess to the smoke which lasted throughout the bowl. Thanks for sharing this and creating, yet another, tobacco project for me to try. Lol

~Darin
 

ChinaVoodoo

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This is madness. I pitched wine yeast into a 5ish lb batch of Perique 6 weeks ago. It smelled like bread for the first two weeks and now it smells pretty nasty, yet with some red wine notes. It consists of a lot of tobacco I didn't like in the first place, so if it doesn't work out, no biggie. Let us see what the next 4 months brings.DSC_0731~2.JPG
 

GreenDragon

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Next experiment. In my continuing bid to eliminate the stinkies (E. coli) in the process, for my next batch I decided to sterilize the tobacco and ferment with a monoculture of yeast. Also, in an attempt to replicate the darkening effects of the true perique process, I decided to increase the alkalinity of the batches in an attempt to increase oxidation.

Procedure:
1) I took a measure of Burley tobacco and moistened it heavily, then divided into 3 equal portions. These I placed in new mason jars. One I left alone (labeled control), to one I added a 1/4 teaspoon of baking soda (labeled BS), and one I added 1/16 teaspoon of NaOH pellets. The jar lids were closed finger tight, then into the HotPot for 3 hours and left to cool overnight. At the same time I started a sterile culture of Red Wine yeast in boiled sugar water solution of 2 Tbls brown sugar to 1 cup water.

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2) After 24 hours the yeast culture was bubbling nicely, so ready to pitch the yeast. Carefully opening the jars I poured an equal amount of yeast culture into each jar, and closed the lids finger tight. I then burped the lids each day to make sure the lids didn't accidentally seal and develop an over-pressure. I let them ferment and rest for 4 weeks.

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3) Today I removed them from each jar and spread out to begin drying.

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Initial observations:
A) NaOH jar is probably a write off. Very bad smell when I first opened the jar to add the yeast. After fermentation the smell was that of burned toast with a little fruit. However, the texture is that of paper pulp. I anticipated that this might happen due to the strength of the base. Likely broke down all the lignin in the leaf leaving just cellulose. Color was darker than control, and leftover liquid also very dark.
B) Baking Soda jar. Actually the darkest leaf of the three, and the darkest liquid. Smell is of very burned toast. Slight breakdown of leaf structure.
C) Control jar. Lightest color and liquid. Smells of fresh bread and jelly. No breakdown of leaf structure.

I should also note that due to the sterile conditions of this trial and the lack of exposure to Oxygen during fermentation no bad smells were produced. However, no darkening occurred either.

Going to let these dry out for a few days then giver 'em a test smoke. Ought to be fun!

Next Experiment:
I will take the procedure that gave the best results above and begin a new batch. However for this next trial I will use a culture of (suspected) Picia anamala that I cultured using a 10% alcohol solution from a sample of WLT perique. You can see the yeast layer on the bottom of the jar (evil glowing green goo).

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GreenDragon

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Well, it was 99F yesterday and 78f today, so I took advantage of the cool front to try out the latest experiments. I mixed up an equalish amount of Va BL, Md cavendish, and beerique. Smoked in a freshly cleaned cob. Tasting notes as follows:

Control
Pleasant tobacco flavor, balanced pH

Baking Soda
Little taste, will not stay lit

NaOH
Most fruity and slight sweetness, slight throat hit, hard to keep lit. Most kick of all three.

Surprisingly, the one I thought would be a washout was the most true to type (NaOH)! Going to chuck the Baking soda batch and blend the other two together. Already thinking about a blend with some red Va, Basma....

Stay tuned

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DistillingJim

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I've not been onto the forum much this year (new baby) but its been nice catching up on this thread. Its got me wondering if koji (Aspergillus oryzae) the fungus used to make sake and miso could be utilized to make a perique analogue. I read a book recently on using koji in fermentation and had been intending to get some, if I do I may have to do some experiementing of my own.
 

Charly

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I've not been onto the forum much this year (new baby) but its been nice catching up on this thread. Its got me wondering if koji (Aspergillus oryzae) the fungus used to make sake and miso could be utilized to make a perique analogue. I read a book recently on using koji in fermentation and had been intending to get some, if I do I may have to do some experiementing of my own.
Welcome back. Yes a new baby can steal a lot of time (congratulations by the way).
 

DistillingJim

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As i understand it creates a fuzz which might be annoying but could potentially be brushed off. It could also be ignored completely if the tobacco is being pressed (which I tend to do when blending). You may be correct though and it could make the toacco unsmokeable, it was just an idea that popped into my head on the back of GreenDragons experimenting.
 

fimbrew

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Koji uses amylase to convert starch o sugars. Yuo need a bacteria or yeast to ferment the sugars.
 

ChinaVoodoo

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Some lead by example. Others by bad example.

My batch of beerique has been fermenting since June 2018, as well as not fermenting at low temperatures last winter.

There is no mold.

It doesn't really smell like poop, but there is something that spikes the gag reflex. There is a sour cherry smell, alcohol, wine, vanilla +++.

I've decided to let it breathe for the next week because there isn't risk of mold at 0°C and see what oxygen and air does to the slight gag reflex chemicals.

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plantdude

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Well, it was 99F yesterday and 78f today, so I took advantage of the cool front to try out the latest experiments. I mixed up an equalish amount of Va BL, Md cavendish, and beerique. Smoked in a freshly cleaned cob. Tasting notes as follows:

Control
Pleasant tobacco flavor, balanced pH

Baking Soda
Little taste, will not stay lit

NaOH
Most fruity and slight sweetness, slight throat hit, hard to keep lit. Most kick of all three.

Surprisingly, the one I thought would be a washout was the most true to type (NaOH)! Going to chuck the Baking soda batch and blend the other two together. Already thinking about a blend with some red Va, Basma....

Stay tuned

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Cool experiment. I wonder if sodium carbonate would work better than NaOH. It would start off more alkaline then revert back into sodium bicarbonate in the presence of water over time.
You should try using honey and a high alcohol content yeast, you could make baccy mead as a byproduct. That would probably require some serious diluting down though:)

If I was a betting man I would say your next experiment with Picia anamala is gong to give you your best results;) Good luck.
 

plantdude

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Slightly off topic but has anyone tried fermenting tobacco like they would with Kimchi, peppers or carrots - i.e. a simple brine solution taking advantage of the naturally occurring L. bacillus strains.
Maybe add the brine, let the tobaco ferment for about 5-7 days at room temp, do a quick water flush to remove the excess salts then dry it?
 
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