Buy Tobacco Leaf Online | Whole Leaf Tobacco

Madfarmer's 2023 Grow

MadFarmer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 7, 2019
Messages
487
Points
93
Location
Arlington. TX
I wanted to give this year's grow a clever title; 2023 Resurrection, 2023 Redemption. But then I didn't want to jinx it.
IMG_20230202_205509292_HDR~2.jpg
Two rows of each variety for 36 plants. My plan is to build a 5x12' raised bed to fill with 16 plants, nevermind I haven't purchased any materials or prepared a space for it.
 

MadFarmer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 7, 2019
Messages
487
Points
93
Location
Arlington. TX
What I did today:
IMG_20230219_142955889_HDR.jpg

Thinned and pricked. If you're a new gardener and want to develop tolerance to culling seedlings, grow tobacco. The small pile of tobacco starts makes tossing a tomato seedling (one variety I got free twice and only planted once) so much easier.
The weather is warm enough the next few days that the eggplant and tomatoes are staying out all night! Their slumber party should last until Wednesday, they grow up so fast.
 

skychaser

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 30, 2012
Messages
1,117
Points
113
Location
NE Washington
Baby killer!!

lol Just kidding. I know how you feel. I often have enough for a salad when I'm done. They are really easy to divide if you have room for more plants. Wait another week or so until they are a little bigger, pop the dirt from the hole and swish the dirt away from the roots in a small bowl of water. Divide them up, re-pot and soak them in. I've divided hundreds of tobacco and tomato seedlings that way.
 

MadFarmer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 7, 2019
Messages
487
Points
93
Location
Arlington. TX
Something got loose among my young plants. I killed an unidentified caterpillar Monday or Tuesday.
IMG_20230405_201351585_HDR.jpgIMG_20230405_201336405_HDR.jpg
The Glessenor was the hardest hit, the Piloto seems unscathed. Fingers crossed I'll have my bed built today full of the salvageable seedlings.
 

Knucklehead

Moderator
Founding Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2012
Messages
12,148
Points
113
Location
NE Alabama
Something got loose among my young plants. I killed an unidentified caterpillar Monday or Tuesday.
View attachment 45495View attachment 45496
The Glessenor was the hardest hit, the Piloto seems unscathed. Fingers crossed I'll have my bed built today full of the salvageable seedlings.
As long as the growth bud wasn't damaged they should all be salvageable. That growth you see now would end up as flyers or trash anyway. I usually snip off the lower leaves and bury the seedlings deeper anyway. What color was the caterpillar?
 

MadFarmer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 7, 2019
Messages
487
Points
93
Location
Arlington. TX
What color was the caterpillar?
It was a gray/brown type I see all the time outside the garage. Soon after we bought the house one spring I found dozens of them climbing the garage door.

They also had quite an aphid infestation going on. I took the tray to the back and hosed off the aphids. The plants will be fine, the gardener's patience is running low. IMG_20230409_072458847~2.jpg
 

deluxestogie

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
May 25, 2011
Messages
23,822
Points
113
Location
near Blacksburg, VA
Bacillus thuringiensis (kurstaki strain) kills caterpillars, and only caterpillars—moth and butterfly larvae. Don't spray it on milkweed and other butterfly-friendly plants. On tobacco, it is sprayed directly on the upper and lower surfaces of the leaves. It lasts about a week, and needs to be sprayed again weekly or after rain. It is organically approved.

Bob
 

MadFarmer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 7, 2019
Messages
487
Points
93
Location
Arlington. TX

MadFarmer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 7, 2019
Messages
487
Points
93
Location
Arlington. TX
It doesn't look like much, but this will be the future home of my 2023 grow. 5'x10' just needs lumber and soil.

IMG_20230416_162434425_HDR.jpg
I spent the better part of the day cleaning out the metal bed and planting not quite the last of my tomatoes. I still feel good about concentrating on cherry tomatoes rather than 12oz slicers. We're out of drought (for now) but it's been dry for April.

To cool my tobacco growing fever I planted a single Glessenor in a pot. This pot and soil gave me the best looking tobacco I had last year, as opposed to the grow bags.
IMG_20230416_160328096.jpg
 

deluxestogie

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
May 25, 2011
Messages
23,822
Points
113
Location
near Blacksburg, VA
You could do what is called a double-dig. It tends to loosen and elevate the soil into a mound the shape of the bed.

double-dig-bed-4.jpg


It's done using two tools: a square garden spade (shovel) and a garden fork. You use the spade to shovel the topsoil to the depth of the blade along a narrow dimension of the bed, moving each shovelful to the far end, just beyond the bed. Then you use the fork in that first trench to loosen the subsoil.

When you start again with the shovel, to dig the next trench, its topsoil is simply dumped onto the adjacent 1st trench. You work your way, trench by trench—shovel then fork, until you finally cover the last trench with the topsoil removed from the very first trench.

Then just fertilize. It's a fair amount of work, but I was doing that with all my garden beds well into my 60s. In subsequent years, you can consider just adding a bag or two of compost, and just tilling it in as usual.

Bob
 

93rdCanadian

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2013
Messages
134
Points
63
Location
Moncton, NB

Ive had good experiences using a sort of modified Hugelkultur. Essentially composting in place and using garden debris to beef up a bed with double digging.

You could also throw in a bale of peat moss plus some oyster shells/other calcium carbonate to adjust Ph. Peat moss goes for $30 CAD per 2.2 cuft bale in Ontario, so may not be cost effective where you are.

Combine both methods to add fertility to the inert peat moss. Coco coir could also work if you get it cheap (but beware poor quality products due to salinity). Coco coir does not need Ph adjustment but still needs additional fertility.
 
Top