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Microorganisms involved in Perique fermentation

Planter

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#1
Although I asked related questions in the other thread, I found this paper is important enough for a new one:

http://legacy.library.ucsf.edu/tid/qad17a99/pdf

"In the early days bacteria and mould are predominant, in the latter stage of the fermentation the microorganisms consist of yeasts exclusively...

Hansenula anomala seems to be mainly responsible for the characteristic fragrance of Perique...

In the early stages of fermentation, pH of the juice becomes acidic by the propagation of bacteria (mainly lactobacilli). When the bacteria disappeared owing to the too low pH (pH 4.6) for their existence, environmental conditions become suitable for growth of the yeasts. This transition is similar to that observed in Sake brewing..."
 

Planter

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#3
I remember you mentioned before that your Perique smells similar to wine made from botrysized grapes. Hansenula is present in Botrytis-infected fruit and able to produce large amounts of acetic acid and ethyl acetate in these wines (more than is wanted in "normal" wines).
An old vinery might be just the place to set some Perique up...
 

deluxestogie

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#4
Great information. I've noticed that my Perique has more of the fruity, prune-like aroma than St. James Parish Perique, which leans more toward barnyard.

Bob
 

oldbear

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#5
I had a small sample of raw perique leaf from the Poche facility and did a test on tobacco leaf inoculating one jar with distilled water and another with an extract from the perique leaves.
There was no significant difference between the two samples.

I suspect that the bacteria and yeast is usually present on the leaves, though it may die off after perique processing.

Oldbear
 

Jitterbugdude

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#6
I don't think your inoculation will yield anything near a real "Perique". The study showed that the process is predominated by bacteria and as the pH drops, yeasts are the primary constituent. You are starting with yeast as an inoculate (with out any bacteria). The bacteria, though it dies off during the process undoubtedly adds to the flavor profile.
 
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