Whole Leaf Tobacco

Need Assistance with Air-Curing Green

paintercote

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2020
Messages
79
Points
33
Location
Washington state / west side
OK, I finally got my tobacco to dry / cure into a beautiful gold color. The large stems are still green so I guess I will leave it until stems are dry. Im tempted to go right on to fermenting but I will let them dry until stems are gold / dry.
 

paintercote

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2020
Messages
79
Points
33
Location
Washington state / west side
I've made some mistakes with kilning my air cured flue-cure varieties (and also by kilning my flue cured flue-cure varieties). If I take air cured Virginia type leaves and put them in the kiln for the full four weeks, the sugars seems to carmelize and burn a bit, to where parts of the leaves turn dark brown, almost black. If it just turns brown, it still tastes good, but if it goes too far it can taste burnt. Experimenting, I found the ideal time in the kiln for Virginia type varieties is one week.

I also messed up some that I flue cured by putting them in the kiln too long.

Temps didn't exceed 125 F.

The 2012 Virginia Bright Leaf that I air cured and aged for a year, then kilned for one week tastes really good. The color did darken but just to a golden brown.
this is so helpful. I have been battling with my Virginia bright. I finally figured out how to get it to turn yellow (use table shuffle). then I got it to turn gold / brown by hanging it at controlled heat and humidity. some of it dried green. The stuff that is looking good (3 weeks) still has green tint in stems. I am patiently waiting for the stems to "brown up" and dry hard without the leaf skins drying too much. Its a tough battle. I am first time grower and built nice kiln for fermenting which I haven't got to that point yet. Would love to get advice before entering kiln from you if that's OK. I will take pictures when ready. Another thing, I have read over and over that kiln process should last 4 to six weeks at 70% RH and 122 degrees. Ive read too many different stories, but I think im starting to understand, a little. thanks again for your post, it was very helpful.
 

Knucklehead

Moderator
Founding Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2012
Messages
10,102
Points
113
Location
NE Alabama
this is so helpful. I have been battling with my Virginia bright. I finally figured out how to get it to turn yellow (use table shuffle). then I got it to turn gold / brown by hanging it at controlled heat and humidity. some of it dried green. The stuff that is looking good (3 weeks) still has green tint in stems. I am patiently waiting for the stems to "brown up" and dry hard without the leaf skins drying too much. Its a tough battle. I am first time grower and built nice kiln for fermenting which I haven't got to that point yet. Would love to get advice before entering kiln from you if that's OK. I will take pictures when ready. Another thing, I have read over and over that kiln process should last 4 to six weeks at 70% RH and 122 degrees. Ive read too many different stories, but I think im starting to understand, a little. thanks again for your post, it was very helpful.
If the leaf is brown go ahead and drop humidity to dry the whole leaf, stems, leaf the whole works. Time to let it die and dry.
 

paintercote

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2020
Messages
79
Points
33
Location
Washington state / west side
Well, its been fun. I learned that the best way to cure (what I call browning before fermenting) is to do the "table shuffle" until almost completely yellow before hanging. Im in wa. state and that's what worked for me. The pile on the left of course dried green due to me hanging them green and fighting with humidifiers and heat. I GOT GOOD RESULTS FROM TABLE SHUFFLE. I guess the green pile is trash but it wasn't a total loss because they make good camouflage or maybe I can start a band called "Kentucky dreadlocks". Like a bad relationship where you storm into house after break up and scream, I just want my albums, I got my rubber bands back.

I guess im moving on to / or not, the kiln that I built ( humidifier, heater, tiny fan ) and run about 122 degrees and 70 RH for 4 weeks or until I don't smell pneumonia. ???? As usual, im open for advice.
 

Attachments

paintercote

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2020
Messages
79
Points
33
Location
Washington state / west side
Can you look at the thread I just posted, title "I just want my albums back". After your message I took down the tent and took photographs of what I have done. Im ready for next step and have wonderful kiln. I downsized the fan to a smaller fan. the one in picture is too much.
 

Attachments

Top