Whole Leaf Tobacco

Nice Cigar Blends: Webmost

webmost

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Joined
Jan 21, 2013
Messages
1,786
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63
Location
Newark DE
October 2017 I rolled a batch of coronas I called "Flan", because they came out sweet as that caramel custard. The filler was 1/2 each Corojo seco, viso, and ligero, with 1/2 leaf of Olor, bound in something or other from Columbia, and with a Sumatran binder as the wrapper. Here is a pic (crudely made stick):


I had way too much of a Habano 2000 wrapper at the time. This wrapper was oily and aromatic, but absolutely flame retardant. Could not get it to burn period. So I took and shrouded each Flan in leaves of that stuff, (c.f. Leaf by Oscar) like so:



Set the batch in a tin cookie can to steep.

So here we are near three years later. I smoke one about once a year. Sparked one yesterday. Holy crap, that right there is a richness!

https://i.imgur.com/Tlroptb.jpg
 

Yvan the terrible

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Joined
May 3, 2019
Messages
64
Points
53
Location
Edmonton, Alberta
Been smoking cigars for a while and rolling for 2 years now and as much as the blend may be an important part of cigar production there has to be a measurement, a scale or some kind of an index on how well some tobacco leaves age.

Some leaves seems to go through a tremendous change over time and some simply don’t. I would strongly suspect that the initial or the amount of fermentation may play a huge roll into the “ageability” if this is a word but still with my limited rolling experience leaves that may look similar at first will develop very differently over time.

I personally age 95% of the gars I roll and looking at my notes I am starting to see how my first impression becomes way off after six months or more of aging, A smoke that I thought was good on first trial may not have improve and one that I thought was kind of mediocre turns out wonderful.
 
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