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perique dipping tobbaco

deluxestogie

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And... Welcome to the forum. Feel free to introduce yourself in the Introduce Yourself forum. Also scan the topics in our Index of Key Forum Threads. Both are linked in the menu bar.

Bob
 

Bixmeyer

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by perique, I meant the saint James perique the tobacco cultivar that is pressed and anaerobically fermented. and by dip traditional north American dip in the snuff form but would most likely use a pressure cooker or instapot method thus rendering it most likely snus as the fermentation would take too long and it would already be fairly fermented.
 

deluxestogie

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This entire Smokeless forum (thousands of posts) has no discussion of using pressure-cured perique as an oral snus. I had hoped that some of our members experienced in smokeless preparations would chime in, since I am not among them.

I sense that you already have a good notion of where to start. Perhaps the trickiest part would be selecting a flavorant that would negate the natural, barnyard pouch aroma of the perique.

The next time I cook a selection of tobaccos into Cavendish, I will include a jar of St. James Parish perique, and see how it changes.

Bob
 

deluxestogie

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The next time I cook a selection of tobaccos into Cavendish, I will include a jar of St. James Parish perique, and see how it changes.
Today, I opened a fresh, vacuum-sealed bag of WLT Perique. I dried half of it for pipe blending. The other half, still soggy-fresh, went into a Mason jar. That jar, along with 3 other jars of tobacco, is currently cooking in a hot water bath (~190°F). I haven't the slightest idea what Cavendish cooking will do to Perique. The cooking process is similar to one approach used to cook snus.

I'll report back in a few days. I might even put a small piece of Perique Cavendish in my mouth, to see if it makes me puke.

Bob
 

Radagast

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see if it makes me puke
Fascinating experiment. I hope you try a piece.
The first time I tried dip when I was like 14 I puked. What causes that, nicotine overload? Or something to do with microbes? I ask because as far as I can tell, the only difference between dip (you have to spit or you will surely puke) and snus (no spitting required) is that snus is pasteurized, apparently rendering it non-pukular.
 

deluxestogie

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As @squeezyjohn pointed out, all those smokeless tobacco nouns mean essentially the same thing, and depend on a cultural context to differentiate them:


Perique has a natural, barnyard (i.e. fecal) aroma, which is an attribute I would not be eager to impart to my breath. Vomiting is a natural response to excess nicotine absorption, and it is why toddlers who eat a cigarette vomit, rather than die. Absorption from tobacco leaf is gradual, rather than instantaneous (as compared to a nicotine solution).

My curiosity about cooking Perique into Cavendish is to answer the following questions:
  • does it still smell like something that should be shoveled into a pile?
  • does it release too much nicotine when placed in the mouth (a pH question)?
  • does the Cavendish process result in yet another unique and interesting pipe blending ingredient?
Bob
 

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Fascinating experiment. I hope you try a piece.
The first time I tried dip when I was like 14 I puked. What causes that, nicotine overload? Or something to do with microbes? I ask because as far as I can tell, the only difference between dip (you have to spit or you will surely puke) and snus (no spitting required) is that snus is pasteurized, apparently rendering it non-pukular.
The pasteurization process reduces nitrosamines, which upset your stomach. There’s also no or little drip I guess partly because of putting it in your upper lip. Another difference is that Snus is very finely ground, you want even a good percentage of tobacco dust in there. I believe American dip is always coarser.
 

deluxestogie

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I placed around half of a WLT Perique ½-pound bag into a 1 quart Mason jar, leaving it as-is. I added no additional water. This was simmered at about 185-190°F for 15 hours in a hot water bath. After cooling, the jar was unsealed, and its contents untangled and spread onto a cookie sheet to dry on a sunny, window shelf in my enclosed back porch.

Garden20221029_6719_PeriqueCavendish_drying_700.jpg


While still presenting a robust aroma, the damp Perique CAVENDISH no longer reminds me as much of a barnyard—more like damp, forest humus, when the duff is cleared away. Once it is adequately dried for storage, I will investigate its taste and blending qualities. I do expect its color to revert to a medium, dull brown, rather than black, after it is dry.

Since I spread and dried the other half of the bag of WLT Perique (uncooked) a couple of days ago, I will be able to compare them directly.

Bob
 

deluxestogie

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Garden20221107_6730_PeriqueVsPeriqueCAVENDISH_500.jpg


Visually, the Perique CAVENDISH is slightly darker than the uncooked Perique, once both are dried to low case (dry but somewhat flexible). The barnyard aroma of Perique is diminished when cooked. If I smelled the pouch aroma of straight Perique first, then sniffed the pouch aroma of the Cavendish, I sensed no barnyard in the latter. The following morning, I reversed the sniffing sequence. When smelled first, the Cavendish version definitely presents a mild barnyard aroma, but the aroma of the uncooked version is noticeably more intense.

I placed a ¾" long, narrow strip of the Cavendish Perique between my lower lip and gums. The taste is pleasant, and slightly salty, even though absolutely nothing was added to the WLT Perique when I cooked it into Cavendish. I could sense a gentle nicotine release, but no sudden increase. This generated almost no saliva. I left it there for about 30 minutes, while reading, then removed it. At the 30 minute mark, it still seemed to have the same taste.

Since I am not a user of smokeless tobacco, I will be moving on to comparing the pH modulation of the Perique vs Perique Cavendish when blended with Flue-cured Virginia Bright—as a pipe tobacco blend. That commentary will go into the Pipe Smokers forum.

Bob
 
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