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Whole Leaf Tobacco

Preparing Burley for cigarette blend

jekylnz

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I've used glycerin before, wish I hadn't. I've used it in casings before as well as without. IMO when mixed, I never noticed a difference with or without. Using it pure made a semi-sticky leaf that for me atleast slowed down the burning a lot but just wasn't something I wanted to smoke too much.
I think glycerine just helps it make the solution abit thicker.which helps it stay on.also helps keep tobacco in case,and stops it going completely dry.like propylene glycol
 

holyRYO

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Thanks guys, I tried a coulple "toasted" burley batches, the harshness is much improved. Someday I will get some PG and see for myself... trying to duplicate the silkiness of Prince Albert.
 

holyRYO

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The Burley is getting more toast time. First pass was 200 F 20min, ever so slight improvement. Back in it went, 200 F 1 hr, slight improvement. Back in it goes, 225 F for 3 hrs... rehydrate and see what happens. Along with it, I have two Virginias wrapped in foil, attempting a "stoved" process on them...
 

holyRYO

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The Burley is getting more toast time. First pass was 200 F 20min, ever so slight improvement. Back in it went, 200 F 1 hr, slight improvement. Back in it goes, 225 F for 3 hrs... rehydrate and see what happens. Along with it, I have two Virginias wrapped in foil, attempting a "stoved" process on them...
Stuck some Maryland in there also, for good measure... wish I had a fast forward button...
 

FmGrowit

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I really appreciate your efforts in attempting to solve the toasted Burley mystery.

Just for reference...there are a couple of charts floating around the forum with temperatures used in Burley toasting ovens by commercial processors. I seem to recall 230°F being the magic number. I'm sure commercial processors don't have an hour to toast Burley.

That being said...there might very well be a better temperature and time for producing a better product. My guess is the commercial operations use the least amout of effort and the fastest time to produce a minimally "acceptable" product.
 

johnlee1933

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That being said...there might very well be a better temperature and time for producing a better product. My guess is the commercial operations use the least amout of effort and the fastest time to produce a minimally "acceptable" product.
Strongly agreed. And they can "correct" deficiencies chemically while we strive for the best chenical free tobacco.
 

workhorse_01

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Your probably right john ,but on the other hand Copenhagen is just the opposite after fire curing with oak and hickory Copenhagen is stored in hogs heads for three years before being processed. Snuff and smokes must be farther apart than I thought.
 

holyRYO

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The Burley is getting more toast time. First pass was 200 F 20min, ever so slight improvement. Back in it went, 200 F 1 hr, slight improvement. Back in it goes, 225 F for 3 hrs... rehydrate and see what happens. Along with it, I have two Virginias wrapped in foil, attempting a "stoved" process on them...
Burley 225 F for 3 hrs was the most improved so far... next will try a fresh batch at 250 F for 1 hr, again more time if needed... "it's no worse for wear" after all that, reconstitutes "fresh as can be"
 

Wagner

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Another company that deals in tobacco processing equipment offers a casing cylinder that first raises the temp of the tobacco with steam, then applies the casing

"The process principle relies upon the fact that the tobacco is at its most receptive, open state when it is within the conditioning cylinder. Because it is warm, it relaxes and unfolds, thus exposing the maximum surface area to the action of the casing spray. In this warm state, the pores of the leaf surfaces are also more open, thus maximizing their ability to absorb the droplets of casing liquor which are sprayed onto them."

holyRYO, I'm conflicted. You've had success with long periods of toasting your burley, yet somehow I feel that the industrial sized toasting equipment must do it's job in a more timely manner. Do you think an aspiring toaster can develop a nose for when the process has reached an optimal 'doneness'?

Total ignorance on my part, simply throwing stuff at the wall.....
 

holyRYO

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Hell if I know... assume higher temps, shorter duration... start with low grade flavorless thin leaf, less toasting required (?)... mix in enough recon it does not matter (?)... sauce and additives instead of long toast (?)

Nice thing about the burley, does not seam like I can hurt it, short of it catching on fire. Next round is 250 F for 1 hr... more time if required.

So far actually not done any "toasting", more like low temp baking. It takes me 3 hrs to cook my pot roast at 250 F, for all the chemical reactions to complete, why not my tobacco? lol
 

holyRYO

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Anybody know what elevated temps and duration does to nicotine? Hate to loose any precious vitamins...
 

DonH

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Hell if I know... assume higher temps, shorter duration... start with low grade flavorless thin leaf, less toasting required (?)... mix in enough recon it does not matter (?)... sauce and additives instead of long toast (?)

Nice thing about the burley, does not seam like I can hurt it, short of it catching on fire. Next round is 250 F for 1 hr... more time if required.

So far actually not done any "toasting", more like low temp baking. It takes me 3 hrs to cook my pot roast at 250 F, for all the chemical reactions to complete, why not my tobacco? lol
That seems like way too long to me. You could lose flavor.
 

bryonlr

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The only thing stopping me from creating the perfect blend is the burley toasting process. Ive set the smoke detectors off so many times, the little woman has threatened to ban me to the garage :mad: Watching this thread very close. :)
 

Seanz

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The only thing stopping me from creating the perfect blend is the burley toasting process. Ive set the smoke detectors off so many times, the little woman has threatened to ban me to the garage :mad: Watching this thread very close. :)
I've found that living alone is the best way to toast your tobacco:D I actually like the smell. My fridge chamber is in the wash house and even thats not an unpleasant smell
 

holyRYO

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That seems like way too long to me. You could lose flavor.
This batch of Burley has been toasted 3 times, between 200 and 225 f, for a total of 4 hrs and 20 min, and rehydrated 3 times. I can not detect any loss of flavor, nor any signs of "wear and tear", if anything the flavor has improved... the durability amazes me. Must be the quality leaf...
 
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