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Quarantine Cooking

tullius

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Falafel, burgers and sauce look super tasty, making me hungry. Try turning your flattop or pan up to just shy of smoking to get a little more color on those pita, accentuates the flavors, and you'll get an even better rise (yours have very good rise as pictured).

Nice work. (y)
 

ChinaVoodoo

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Here's a project for your quarantine: Sour-dough bread.


Bob
My wife is intent on sourdough bread herself. She's picking up 20lbs of organic flour tomorrow.
 

GreenDragon

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Funny you should mention it, I woke up our stater tonight to make bread tomorrow. My wife “started” this sourdough starter 10-31-2010 and it’s given us 100’s of loaves over the years. I used it the other weekend to make a loaf of pumpernickel that was awesome.

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deluxestogie

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In most parts of the country, commercial, retail packets of yeast have gone MIA.

Mix up non-chlorinated water and flour, 50:50. Let it sit out. Stir it once a day. When it rises, save about 10% of it to add to another flour/water mix. Repeat for several weeks. It depends on wild yeast. It seems to encourage the yeast better with whole wheat flour, rather than bleached. Micronutrients, I guess.

If you Google "making sourdough starter", there are a gazillion recipes.

Bob
 

GreenDragon

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In most parts of the country, commercial, retail packets of yeast have gone MIA.

Mix up non-chlorinated water and flour, 50:50. Let it sit out. Stir it once a day. When it rises, save about 10% of it to add to another flour/water mix. Repeat for several weeks. It depends on wild yeast. It seems to encourage the yeast better with whole wheat flour, rather than bleached. Micronutrients, I guess.

If you Google "making sourdough starter", there are a gazillion recipes.

Bob
You can accelerate the process by adding grape or potato skins to the flour, or any local fruit. Once it starts bubbling you are good to go. Our starter is fed a 1/4 cup each dry milk powder and potato flakes and a cup of flour each time it’s used plus water at least once a month. Take out of the fridge, add the goodies, let wake up, use half to make bread and put half back in the fridge. Repeat indefinitely.
Tonight’s supper was lentil soup and fresh bread. Yummy!

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leverhead

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I had some Rye flour on hand and decided to try the starter mentioned on the BBC site (post 4). It seemed more than a little dry, so I added more water to make it like a batter. It may take a few weeks , but I'll let you know how it ends up.

I have two other starters. One is from Red Star brand and is labeled "Instant Sourdough". I started it eight months ago and it still works well, maybe a little bland. The second is "wild" that was started in the kitchen on just wheat flour and water, it's the more interesting of the two.
 

GreenDragon

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I had some Rye flour on hand and decided to try the starter mentioned on the BBC site (post 4). It seemed more than a little dry, so I added more water to make it like a batter. It may take a few weeks , but I'll let you know how it ends up.

I have two other starters. One is from Red Star brand and is labeled "Instant Sourdough". I started it eight months ago and it still works well, maybe a little bland. The second is "wild" that was started in the kitchen on just wheat flour and water, it's the more interesting of the two.
If using rye flour for a starter you may be able to use it as soon as 4-5 days, as my understanding is that rye will ferment faster than regular flour. Let us know how it turns out! :)
 

leverhead

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By this morning it had had a very fine foam on top, it almost looked like the head on a beer. It smells pretty good. I poured of most of the bowl and fed it. I can't say that I'm bored, but this doesn't take much of my time.
 

leverhead

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Put some sugar, warm water and the yeast in a bowl. It might take a little time, but if it doesn't proof add some flour and try to catch some wild stuff.
 
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