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Cray Squirrel

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Why though?

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ProfClio

3.0 out of 5 stars It's all Politics
Reviewed in the United States on August 5, 2015
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Read this at my History Book Club (Politics & Prose in Washington DC). There were a few who really enjoyed it. I rate it OK at best. The work is a tantalising survey. There is a lot that doesn't get the coverage that I had hoped for (Canada's first nations being one example) and the focus is definitely on the political. So this work has nothing to say about, say, cultural history. It would then better include "Political" in the title. Whenever an interesting issue was raised, the discussion was, as is necessary in a work like this, over before it could be developed. Perhaps this wasn't a book that I should have chosen although the US history version is much better.
 

waikikigun

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Finally, after several months of reading, I now know all about the history of Canadian penguins.

Garden20210610_5763_book_Bothwell_Canada_cropped.jpg


Bob
I found that book much too penguin-centric. Until you've read The Long-tailed Weasel History of Canada you don't really begin to get the full picture.
 

deluxestogie

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Why though?
Are you asking why I would read a history of the most important neighbor and ally of the United States, with whom we share an enormous, unfortified border?

As for the silly criticism that it's just a political history, and ignores "cultural" history: Of course! I don't know of history books of any part of the world regarding any epoch that have been written as much more than the political history of the region--until authors in the last 15 or 20 years. It has been only in the 21st century that we see the explosion of ethnographical history and practically any objective analysis of the cultural impact of the "discovery" of America, or the contribution of, say Genghis Khan to the blossoming of Europe. Written histories have for millennia been about victorious leaders.

I have read history extensively for the past half-century. In early summer of 2021, I realized that I knew more about the history ancient Sumer and Akkad than I did about Canada. I purchased used copies of two different histories of Canada. Bothwell was the briefer of the two. The other (a 1200 page monster) will have to wait for the next pandemic lockdown.

So...which specific book on the history of Canada would you recommend? I've asked Canadians. Suggestions welcomed.

Bob
 

Knucklehead

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The
Are you asking why I would read a history of the most important neighbor and ally of the United States, with whom we share an enormous, unfortified border?

As for the silly criticism that it's just a political history, and ignores "cultural" history: Of course! I don't know of history books of any part of the world regarding any epoch that have been written as much more than the political history of the region--until authors in the last 15 or 20 years. It has been only in the 21st century that we see the explosion of ethnographical history and practically any objective analysis of the cultural impact of the "discovery" of America, or the contribution of, say Genghis Khan to the blossoming of Europe. Written histories have for millennia been about victorious leaders.

I have read history extensively for the past half-century. In early summer of 2021, I realized that I knew more about the history ancient Sumer and Akkad than I did about Canada. I purchased used copies of two different histories of Canada. Bothwell was the briefer of the two. The other (a 1200 page monster) will have to wait for the next pandemic lockdown.

So...which specific book on the history of Canada would you recommend? I've asked Canadians. Suggestions welcomed.

Bob
French-Indian War was fascinating. British, Colonials, French, all with Indian allies and fighting in Nova Scotia, Quebec, and the Colonies.
 

deluxestogie

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One of my favorite old Nintendo games was a strategy game on the subject of the internecine wars in China during the medieval period: Romance of the Three Kingdoms. Years later (9 years ago), I played it again, but this time as an NES emulation on my Windows laptop. (I still have a small stack of blank maps I printed, showing the outlines of the provinces of China, in order to jot down strategically useful data during game play.)

Garden20220113_6179_RomanceOfThe3Kingdoms_NES_booklet_600.jpg


A couple of weeks ago, I discovered that the title of that favorite game was also the title of the very first Chinese novel, a historical fiction named Romance of the Three Kingdoms. It's creation is a bit blurry, but seems to have originated from an actual historical chronicle written several hundred years earlier. The historical fiction was first published in the 1500s. I located a modern English translation, and purchased it—two volumes. They arrived today.

Garden20220113_6175_RomanceOfThe3Kingdoms_front_600.jpg


Garden20220113_6178_RomanceOfThe3Kingdoms_spines_600.jpg


The two volumes together add up to 1360 pages. It's going to be a bit before I get to it.

Bob
 

deluxestogie

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The early strategy games were heavy on text and still graphics, with little or no animation. Lots of data panels, with your actions actuated by menu. Romance of the Three Kingdoms, and Genghis Kahn were two of those that I found to be both excellent and enjoyable. You could always identify a strategy game, because you had to actually read the instructions. But I had not expected the manual to be 1360 pages.

Bob
 
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