Whole Leaf Tobacco

Red Virginia

DGBAMA

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2013
Messages
4,420
Points
63
Location
NORTH ALABAMA
I've noticed that the aroma of flue-cured tobacco takes a week or two to develop after it comes out of the kiln.

Bob
Absolutely! Fresh from the cure, I get almost zero aroma even when it first comes back into case. Takes a few days before I can begin to judge smell.
 

Jitterbugdude

Moderator
Founding Member
Joined
May 22, 2011
Messages
4,210
Points
113
Location
Northeast Maryland
I've noticed that the aroma of flue-cured tobacco takes a week or two to develop after it comes out of the kiln.

Bob
That could be because freshly flue cured tobacco is high in sugars. Over time (especially after being bulked) the sugars convert into reducing sugars. Reducing sugars are basically a "regular" sugar with an aldehyde radical attached to it. Aldehydes are the flavor and good smell things that food chemists like so much.
 

ProfessorPangloss

Amateur Kentuckian
Joined
Dec 18, 2014
Messages
485
Points
0
Location
The Bluegrass
I realize it's a year later, but I'm curious how this all turned out. I'm thinking of trying VA of some kind next year, so I'll need to build a kiln, and I love the sound of red Virginia and homemade Perique. Did the flavor come out right after the temperature bump?
 

Planter

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2014
Messages
255
Points
28
That could be because freshly flue cured tobacco is high in sugars. Over time (especially after being bulked) the sugars convert into reducing sugars. Reducing sugars are basically a "regular" sugar with an aldehyde radical attached to it. Aldehydes are the flavor and good smell things that food chemists like so much.
Yes, something is definitely happening there. I have a tin of Samuel Gawith's Grousemoor (steamed and slightly stoved flue-cured), which originally was bright lemon-yellow. I liked the aroma then, but found it burned a bit harsh and hot, with blackish ashes, and a note of burned sugar. I forgot about it for a year. A few weeks ago I opened it again, and the colour had changed to a beautiful orange. It is really smooth now, ashes are white, no bite, slow burn, really good now in any respect.
I wonder what the mechanism of aging is in flue-cured. One year in a moist environment (the tin dried down from rather wet to ideal moisture) makes a world of a difference.
My own flue-cured Orientals went through a similar colour change, but mostly the leaves on the outside of the bunches. (Storage is rather dry, though).
 
Top