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redxxxx1 Tobacco plants 2020

deluxestogie

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Wet-bulb/dry-bulb is the astrolabe of humidity. Use a hygrometer (or a compass instead of an astrolabe).

If you look at a USDA hardiness zone map:

http://www.forestseedlingnetwork.com/media/15881/usda_hardiness_zones.jpg

and compare it to historical tobacco growing areas:


It would suggest that Wisconsin Seedleaf would match your zone. The definitive database of "days to maturity" (mysteriously re-christened as "weeks to maturity") is the USDA ARS-GRIN tobacco seed bank.

If you enter Nicotiana tabacum in the search box here:


you can explore any of the ~3000 variety accessions. The datapoint of WEEKS TO MATURITY can be directly searched. Below is the list that includes 5 to 6.4 weeks:


You can then click on each of the accession numbers to read the detail of the specific varieties. (Yes, it's clumsy.) The measurement is from transplant to 50% in blossom. On the other hand, I've found much of that data on days (or weeks) to maturity to be unreliable.

Bob
 

redxxxx1

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Wet-bulb/dry-bulb is the astrolabe of humidity. Use a hygrometer (or a compass instead of an astrolabe).

If you look at a USDA hardiness zone map:

http://www.forestseedlingnetwork.com/media/15881/usda_hardiness_zones.jpg

and compare it to historical tobacco growing areas:


It would suggest that Wisconsin Seedleaf would match your zone. The definitive database of "days to maturity" (mysteriously re-christened as "weeks to maturity") is the USDA ARS-GRIN tobacco seed bank.

If you enter Nicotiana tabacum in the search box here:


you can explore any of the ~3000 variety accessions. The datapoint of WEEKS TO MATURITY can be directly searched. Below is the list that includes 5 to 6.4 weeks:


You can then click on each of the accession numbers to read the detail of the specific varieties. (Yes, it's clumsy.) The measurement is from transplant to 50% in blossom. On the other hand, I've found much of that data on days (or weeks) to maturity to be unreliable.

Bob
Thanks for all the links, and the time you spent putting them together. It will help me plan for next year. My intended goal is to growing tobacco that will acclimate to growing and air curing in this zone.

Red
 

deluxestogie

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It takes me weeks of pondering to plan next season's grow. It took me one weekend to build a kiln that also works as a flue-curing chamber. And keep in mind that tobacco is grown commercially in Nepal. My general impression is that there is only a handful of varieties that are meaningfully late maturing, whereas the vast majority will begin providing leaf that can be primed at about 2 months post transplant, or stalk-harvested before 3 months post transplant. If you can solve the curing situation for your climate, then you can grow most varieties.

Bob

EDIT: We have forum members in Vermont who grow pretty much any varieties they choose.
 

redxxxx1

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It takes me weeks of pondering to plan next season's grow. It took me one weekend to build a kiln that also works as a flue-curing chamber. And keep in mind that tobacco is grown commercially in Nepal. My general impression is that there is only a handful of varieties that are meaningfully late maturing, whereas the vast majority will begin providing leaf that can be primed at about 2 months post transplant, or stalk-harvested before 3 months post transplant. If you can solve the curing situation for your climate, then you can grow most varieties.

Bob

EDIT: We have forum members in Vermont who grow pretty much any varieties they choose.
Yes,building a flue curing box would solve the problem . My problem(which is a noted problem in curing sheds) my shed and under my greenhouse the ground is blue clay about 2 ft down below the topsoil so its always damp and cool ,For starters,I'm going to address the ground moisture with some heavy mil plastic to get me through the rest of the harvest.
 

Oldfella

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Thanks for all the links, and the time you spent putting them together. It will help me plan for next year. My intended goal is to growing tobacco that will acclimate to growing and air curing in this zone.

Red
Northwood seeds have a good tobacco seed catalog. If you click on a variety you think you may like, it tells you a bit about the plants, pics, growing conditions, and, time to maturity, ect.
Then they will sell you the seeds, at a very reasonable price. They are a good crowd to deal with and Paul the boss man is a member of this forum, (@skychaser).
Cheers
Oldfella
 

plantdude

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I figured it can be done, tobacco was grown in NH by the early settlers .I had seen an old map showing it was grown in the Connecticut river valley from Keene to Hanover West of me. the climate zone is 1 warmer than here.I still need to figure out the days of maturity and air curing abilities ,so far Virginia is not a good choice its too finicky. ,Burley may be the strain for me ,I'm going to find out,by cutting and hanging the whole plant.
Tobacco takes 90 to 120 days to mature after its transplanted and 60 to 90 days as a seedling That's 6-8 months,
If anyone knows of a chart or list of "day to maturity" of different tobacco strains please point me in that direction, I have not been able to find that information.
Some of our friends up in the great white north like @ChinaVoodoo may be able to recommend some varieties and tricks for short season growing. I'm pretty sure delgold was actually a variety developed in Canada. Northwoods seeds
Is an excellent company for getting seeds from and is highly recommended by many of the forum members. They have a description of the plants if you click on their seed list that often contains days to maturity. Some varieties like Adonis (which I have never grown) do say they were developed for cooler regions and can take mild frosts. That may be helpful info.

Despite my long growing season I still like to grow indoors. If you have the space and a few inexpensive LED plant grow lights its pretty amazing how much you can grow. The plants will stay pretty small if you keep them pot bound. That may be a trick to use to your advantage for a jump start on the following year.
 

redxxxx1

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Northwood seeds have a good tobacco seed catalog. If you click on a variety you think you may like, it tells you a bit about the plants, pics, growing conditions, and, time to maturity, ect.
Then they will sell you the seeds, at a very reasonable price. They are a good crowd to deal with and Paul the boss man is a member of this forum, (@skychaser).
Cheers
Oldfella
Thanks, I found Northwood tobacco seeds page and bookmarked it.
 

redxxxx1

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Some of our friends up in the great white north like @ChinaVoodoo may be able to recommend some varieties and tricks for short season growing. I'm pretty sure delgold was actually a variety developed in Canada. Northwoods seeds
Is an excellent company for getting seeds from and is highly recommended by many of the forum members. They have a description of the plants if you click on their seed list that often contains days to maturity. Some varieties like Adonis (which I have never grown) do say they were developed for cooler regions and can take mild frosts. That may be helpful info.

Despite my long growing season I still like to grow indoors. If you have the space and a few inexpensive LED plant grow lights its pretty amazing how much you can grow. The plants will stay pretty small if you keep them pot bound. That may be a trick to use to your advantage for a jump start on the following year.
I prefer to grow outside(cramped for space indoors) but I do have a small indoor grow tent (20"x48"x60) w a heat pad and a 360w led light,to start seedlings March 1st, 2 yrs now,They got big so fast before its warm enough (last frost date ,May 15) ,I had to buy a cheapo $69 green house,put my LED ,heater and heat pad outside in the green house. I bookmarked Northwood seeds page.So I can look through it during the winter ,and make plans for next year.

Red
 

ChinaVoodoo

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I'm a little late to this conversation. As for the maritime climate, I wouldn't worry. There was an active tobacco industry in Nova Scotia for decades, and still is one in Ontario and Quebec. Canada had multiple tobacco research laboratories for a long time. I think they might be down to one. I've of the forum's founding members was from New Brunswick.

I have had difficulty with growth rate on Burley. They should be in the most fertile, most sunny, and warmest locations. It's not that they don't ripen in time, it's that they don't grow as well in 10-20°C weather.

No matter what tobacco it is, i ends up with a huge harvest before the first heavy frost. But I'm in a much cooler area than yourself.
 

ChinaVoodoo

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I have not noticed Canadian flue cured strains growing differently from those of other regions. The breeding that was conducted was focused on qualities and resistances other than climactic suitability. However, government funded tobacco research meant to increase profit has resulted in some really strong contenders for anyone. Delgold decades later has a great reputation.
 

ChinaVoodoo

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Tobacco, tomatoes and peppers benefit from a thin, 1/4" to 1/2" layer of black wood mulch, as well as E-W running (south facing) raised rows. Ground temperature is more important than air temperature, and these two things make a difference.
 

redxxxx1

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Tobacco, tomatoes and peppers benefit from a thin, 1/4" to 1/2" layer of black wood mulch, as well as E-W running (south facing) raised rows. Ground temperature is more important than air temperature, and these two things make a difference.
I used leaves and straw mulch for the purpose of keeping the weeds out and dirt off the leave.I 'llnever mulch again I had slugs up the ass,good thing I put 2-3 plants per hill,I would have lost half I picked slugs by hand every night for a month at least 100 a night ,i wore rubber gloves and a head lamp,thew em in a container of rock salt and water,Ill never mulch again it gives the slugs to many places to hide in the moisture ,even when its hot and sunny.
 

deluxestogie

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Just sprinkle Sluggo (bran with iron phosphate) around the bed a few days prior to transplant. You have to sprinkle more if it rains. This is a safe way to avoid the headache of slugs on tobacco. Once the transplants have been in the ground for two or three weeks, they are too toxic for the slugs. Also, placing several transplants into the same general location causes them to inhibit each others growth.

Bob
 

redxxxx1

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Just sprinkle Sluggo (bran with iron phosphate) around the bed a few days prior to transplant. You have to sprinkle more if it rains. This is a safe way to avoid the headache of slugs on tobacco. Once the transplants have been in the ground for two or three weeks, they are too toxic for the slugs. Also, placing several transplants into the same general location causes them to inhibit each others growth.

Bob
I had read about that method,I' have to remember iron phosphate for next year.I ended up putting beer traps.they work, but not efficiently I had 2 types of them, slugs like alcohol with their nicotine
 

plantdude

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I had read about that method,I' have to remember iron phosphate for next year.I ended up putting beer traps.they work, but not efficiently I had 2 types of them, slugs like alcohol with their nicotine
Sacrilege! No wastey the beer!:ROFLMAO:
 

ChinaVoodoo

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I specifically meant a very thin layer of mulch. I also specified black mulch. A thick layer of brown mulch like you used keeps it cool and moist by insulating it, and that's why slugs like it. You don't want mulch that will cool the ground and the roots of your plants.

A very thin layer of black mulch increases the absorption of the sun's heat because of the colour and doesn't insulate because it's very thin.
 

redxxxx1

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I specifically meant a very thin layer of mulch. I also specified black mulch. A thick layer of brown mulch like you used keeps it cool and moist by insulating it, and that's why slugs like it. You don't want mulch that will cool the ground and the roots of your plants.

A very thin layer of black mulch increases the absorption of the sun's heat because of the colour and doesn't insulate because it's very thin.
I knew want you meant about the solar absorption. I have been raising thousands of compost worms in my manure/leaf pile so when started my garden this year I decided to put worms in between the hilled rows I put a mixture of leaves manure and worms 6+ deep, then straw specifically to keep it moists so the worms had food and would't die off .I wasn't thinking about it holding the cold in ,or all the slugs that moved in wit the worms
 
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