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Ropp Pipes

deluxestogie

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Ropp Sandblasted Canadienne

Ropp_Canadienne_sandblast.jpg


The above image is from the smokingpipes.com website. (The promptest shipping from any vendor from which I've ordered anything in the last two years.) I selected this particular instance from several others specifically because I found the swirling grain of the sandblasted bowl interesting. The pipe details:
  • Length: 6.84 in./173.74 mm.
  • Weight: 1.21 oz./34.34 g.
  • Bowl Height: 1.89 in./48.12 mm.
  • Chamber Depth: 1.64 in./41.72 mm.
  • Chamber Diameter: 0.83 in./21.05 mm.
  • Outside Diameter: 1.42 in./36.09 mm.
  • Stem Material: Vulcanite
  • Filter: None
  • Shape: Canadian
  • Finish: Sandblast
  • Material: Briar
  • Country: France
  • Price: $75
Chapuis-Comoy, maker of the Chacom pipes, now runs the century-old (started during the 19th century) Ropp pipe factory, in France. Unlike the Italian, Rossi pipes, which are cosmetic seconds of already turned Savinelli pipes, this Ropp pipe is manufactured from stummels that were created, yet left incomplete, when the Ropp factory closed in 1991. Most of the Ropp pipe line consists of lighter, more delicate, smaller shapes. This Sandblasted Canadienne is large, long (not suited well for clenching), and sports a huge bowl capacity. Its length renders it unwieldy for smoking during physical activities. The benefit of the "Canadian" shape is the natural cooling effect of its long, oval-shaped shank.

I always smoke a pipe while working at the computer, and no longer clench any of my pipes. A larger bowl means a longer smoke for a single bowl, resulting in fewer repacks and less frequent need to clean it. The larger bowl diameter provides denser smoke per puff.

Garden20220121_6191_pipe_RoppCanadienne_package_600.jpg


Garden20220121_6192_pipe_RoppCanadienne_LSide_600.jpg


Garden20220121_6193_pipe_RoppCanadienne_RSide_600.jpg


Garden20220121_6194_pipe_RoppCanadienne_Top_600.jpg


Garden20220121_6195_pipe_RoppCanadienne_Bottom_600.jpg


Garden20220121_6196_pipe_RoppCanadienne_BrandMark_600.jpg


Garden20220121_6197_pipe_RoppCanadienne_inHand_600.jpg


In my hand, this does not feel heavy, but much of its weight is situated 6 inches from the bit. My codger hands really appreciate the non-skid tread of a sandblasted surface.

Straight pipes (not just Canadian shape) were the standard pipe of TV dads in the family comedies of the 1950s and early 1960s. By about 1970, they were seen as stodgy. (And of course, smoking at all vanished from TV programs, starting after the initial 1966 Surgeon General's Report.) Younger pipe smokers, including myself, chose mostly bent, Victorian shapes for their new pipes. For decades of pipe smoking, the visual impression of a pipe was the focus of my pipe purchases. Now that I'm old and stodgy enough, and now that I smoke pure, un-cased tobaccos, I have slowly recognized the numerous advantages of a straight pipe. Over the past decade, I have removed metal condensers from any of my pipes that had them (just another gooey component to clean), since my tobacco blends now smoked dry. Without liquid accumulating in the shank and stem, there is no functional advantage to a bent pipe, or one with a drip well inside the shank. Since my face sprouts a combustible moustache front and center, a pipe that can be lit farther away from my nose is a good thing.

When I first began to smoke a pipe, in the early 1970s, an average "nice" pipe sold for about $20; a fancy one, maybe with a sterling band, might go as high as $60. (This was at a time when I could live on $300 a month!) A ~$75 pipe today—if it is well-made—is a bargain, since a pipe will likely last decades, and is considerably less expensive than today's average box of decent cigars.

This Ropp Sandblasted Canadienne is now my 5th Canadian pipe, and the longest of them.

Bob
 

deluxestogie

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What blend will you fire up first in it?
Some vile "English Luxury" that has been stored in a sandwich bag for about 15 years. Since the bowl is not pre-carbonized, it needs to be broken-in, before it has any contact with my nice tobacco. The break-in process smells funky, and takes me about 4 progressively larger fillings of the bowl. Rubbing the raw briar of the bowl interior with a thick slurry of milk and honey (and allowing it to fully dry) will speed-up the break-in process, but I decided to do it the old fashion way—just smoke something in it.

Bob
 

deluxestogie

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Ropp Heritage Sandblast Lumberman (352)

Garden20220220_6229_pipe_RoppLumberman_LSide_700a.jpg


Lumberman? In the single photo from smokingpipes.com—this same left side view—it looked like a slightly heftier Canadian, but with a saddle bit. I was tempted by the somewhat larger specs on the bowl. When the pipe arrived, I found myself truly surprised at the width of the stem.

Garden20220220_6230_pipe_RoppLumberman_top_700a.jpg


Garden20220220_6231_pipe_RoppLumberman_RSide_700a.jpg


Garden20220220_6232_pipe_RoppLumberman_End_200.jpg


Garden20220220_6233_pipe_RoppLumberman_bottom_700.jpg


Garden20220220_6233_pipe_RoppLumberman_bottom_closeup_600.jpg


Since I'm never attempting to engage in physical labor or driving, while smoking a pipe, I see no drawback to a pipe that is clearly not intended for clenching in my teeth. And I prefer a larger bowl and a straight stem. As you can see below, alongside the already substantial Ropp Heritage Sandblast Canadienne, this pipe is a beast. It makes the Canadienne appear dainty!

Garden20220220_6234_pipe_RoppLumberman_comparison01_700.jpg


Garden20220220_6235_pipe_RoppLumberman_comparison02_700.jpg


For further comparison, I've lined up the Lumberman with some of my other "large bowl" pipes.

Garden20220220_6237_pipe_RoppLumberman_comparison04_400.jpg


Garden20220220_6236_pipe_RoppLumberman_comparison03_700.jpg


The Lumberman smokes wonderfully. It easily sits on its flattened bottom. There is so much mass in the briar, that it cools the smoke noticeably better than the Canadienne. And there is something about the gas flow rates when drawing on this fat pipe that seems to minimize any condensation within the stem. (I'm uncertain as to why.)

A word of caution. Although I believe you would be delighted with the smoking quality of the Ropp Lumberman (especially at its low price), don't buy it if you intend to show it to friends. They will laugh at how ugly and clunky it appears. They might even point out your poor taste in pipes.

Bob
 

deluxestogie

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As with my other Ropp pipe, the interior of the Lumberman bowl is raw—not pre-carbonized. Prior to lighting it the first time, I used a paper towel to smear a thin coating of Black Strap Molasses (treacle) over the bare wood surface, then used a cotton-tip swab to remove any that managed to drip to the bottom. After the molasses dried, I filled the bowl with my Burrowing Owl pipe blend (sorry, still classified), and never gave "break-in" a second thought. Dried molasses instantly chars, when it encounters the heat of smoldering tobacco.

Bob
 

Mico

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Good advice for breaking in, since it can get anoying some times. Does it impart any molasses flavor in the long term?

That Heritage line looks good. I was tempted as well by the big capacities, but I'm good in pipes for the moment.
 

deluxestogie

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The molasses completely chars, with no taste at the initial charring, and no molasses flavor then or later. I think this works best with well-burning tobacco in a large bowl, where the heat density easily chars the molasses coating. This is different from casing a pipe tobacco with molasses, since that directly impedes the burn temperature of the blend, and may cause the cased blend to taste bitter (like a damp cigar butt).

As a mischievous child, I would sometimes drop a piece of candy into my father's barbeque grill (when no one was looking) after the coals were fully heated. I could then watch it expand into a tiny, black volcano, and harden to a solid piece of char.

I made this last purchase of the Lumberman pipe ($68) immediately after returning home from paying $360 for my January electric bill. The bill made the cost of the pipe seem like a trifle.

Bob
 

tullius

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Ropp Sandblasted Canadienne

Ropp_Canadienne_sandblast.jpg


The above image is from the smokingpipes.com website. (The promptest shipping from any vendor from which I've ordered anything in the last two years.) I selected this particular instance from several others specifically because I found the swirling grain of the sandblasted bowl interesting. The pipe details:
  • Length: 6.84 in./173.74 mm.
  • Weight: 1.21 oz./34.34 g.
  • Bowl Height: 1.89 in./48.12 mm.
  • Chamber Depth: 1.64 in./41.72 mm.
  • Chamber Diameter: 0.83 in./21.05 mm.
  • Outside Diameter: 1.42 in./36.09 mm.
  • Stem Material: Vulcanite
  • Filter: None
  • Shape: Canadian
  • Finish: Sandblast
  • Material: Briar
  • Country: France
  • Price: $75
Chapuis-Comoy, maker of the Chacom pipes, now runs the century-old (started during the 19th century) Ropp pipe factory, in France. Unlike the Italian, Rossi pipes, which are cosmetic seconds of already turned Savinelli pipes, this Ropp pipe is manufactured from stummels that were created, yet left incomplete, when the Ropp factory closed in 1991. Most of the Ropp pipe line consists of lighter, more delicate, smaller shapes. This Sandblasted Canadienne is large, long (not suited well for clenching), and sports a huge bowl capacity. Its length renders it unwieldy for smoking during physical activities. The benefit of the "Canadian" shape is the natural cooling effect of its long, oval-shaped shank.

I always smoke a pipe while working at the computer, and no longer clench any of my pipes. A larger bowl means a longer smoke for a single bowl, resulting in fewer repacks and less frequent need to clean it. The larger bowl diameter provides denser smoke per puff.

Garden20220121_6191_pipe_RoppCanadienne_package_600.jpg


Garden20220121_6192_pipe_RoppCanadienne_LSide_600.jpg


Garden20220121_6193_pipe_RoppCanadienne_RSide_600.jpg


Garden20220121_6194_pipe_RoppCanadienne_Top_600.jpg


Garden20220121_6195_pipe_RoppCanadienne_Bottom_600.jpg


Garden20220121_6196_pipe_RoppCanadienne_BrandMark_600.jpg


Garden20220121_6197_pipe_RoppCanadienne_inHand_600.jpg


In my hand, this does not feel heavy, but much of its weight is situated 6 inches from the bit. My codger hands really appreciate the non-skid tread of a sandblasted surface.

Straight pipes (not just Canadian shape) were the standard pipe of TV dads in the family comedies of the 1950s and early 1960s. By about 1970, they were seen as stodgy. (And of course, smoking at all vanished from TV programs, starting after the initial 1966 Surgeon General's Report.) Younger pipe smokers, including myself, chose mostly bent, Victorian shapes for their new pipes. For decades of pipe smoking, the visual impression of a pipe was the focus of my pipe purchases. Now that I'm old and stodgy enough, and now that I smoke pure, un-cased tobaccos, I have slowly recognized the numerous advantages of a straight pipe. Over the past decade, I have removed metal condensers from any of my pipes that had them (just another gooey component to clean), since my tobacco blends now smoked dry. Without liquid accumulating in the shank and stem, there is no functional advantage to a bent pipe, or one with a drip well inside the shank. Since my face sprouts a combustible moustache front and center, a pipe that can be lit farther away from my nose is a good thing.

When I first began to smoke a pipe, in the early 1970s, an average "nice" pipe sold for about $20; a fancy one, maybe with a sterling band, might go as high as $60. (This was at a time when I could live on $300 a month!) A ~$75 pipe today—if it is well-made—is a bargain, since a pipe will likely last decades, and is considerably less expensive than today's average box of decent cigars.

This Ropp Sandblasted Canadienne is now my 5th Canadian pipe, and the longest of them.

Bob
Beautiful pipe
 

deluxestogie

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Messages
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Thank you. I was surprised at how differently it smokes from the Rossi Canadian with almost identical specs.
The Rossi pipe looks and feels clunkier, but is a beast at comfortably smoking several consecutive bowls, without cleaning in between. The Ropp, by contrast, appears like a dainty art exhibit piece, but is not as comfortable to hold, feels hotter in my hand—both the bowl and the shank, and really begs to be cleaned after each bowl, even when I'm smoking undoctored, homegrown blends.

Bob
 
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