Northwood seeds

Saving Seed

Orson Carte

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#1
For the purpose of saving viable seed, could someone please advise the method, or indicate at just what stage the flower-head can be safely removed from the plant, or the whole stalk cut and be hung up to dry.
I have been thinking of hanging the whole plant upside down with a large paper bag tied over the seed-head (to catch anything that falls when the pods open up) but is there a better, more practical method?
Thanks.
 

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deluxestogie

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#2
If you have grown only a single variety, and there are absolutely no other tobacco plants within 1-1/2 miles (~2.5 km), then you can harvest pure strain seed without bagging. Otherwise, you need to place a fine mesh bag over the buds before blossoms open, to avoid cross-pollination, and tie it at the bottom, around the stalk.

Once most of the seed pods have mostly browned, cut the stalk below the bag tie, then hang it indoors until it is completely brown and dry (typically a month or more). The seeds generally don't come out of undamaged, dry pods until you crush them.

Tobacco seed should be stored in a cool, dry place.

Bob
 

SmokesAhoy

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#3
Store in an airtight glass or plastic vial with a desiccant pack unless they will be used the next year.
 

Orson Carte

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#4
Bob -
Thanks for the info. I am aware of the need to protect against cross-pollination. I was going to bag a couple of specimens but the seed I'm trying to gather, in the pic shown, is a Virginia Gold variety and I'm almost 100% certain there are no other tobacco plants for miles. I also have two other different varieties growing for seed at widely separated locations.
I only wondered about using a bag over the dried head (to possibly catch the seed) because last year I hung a bunch of whole-stalks, a number of which that had flowered and budded, and every time someone brushed against them they were showered with seed.
Thanks again for your help.
 

ArizonaDave

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#5
Bob -
Thanks for the info. I am aware of the need to protect against cross-pollination. I was going to bag a couple of specimens but the seed I'm trying to gather, in the pic shown, is a Virginia Gold variety and I'm almost 100% certain there are no other tobacco plants for miles. I also have two other different varieties growing for seed at widely separated locations.
I only wondered about using a bag over the dried head (to possibly catch the seed) because last year I hung a bunch of whole-stalks, a number of which that had flowered and budded, and every time someone brushed against them they were showered with seed.
Thanks again for your help.
I've heard some using paper bags (never tried) or this: https://www.amazon.com/Gallon-Elast...4&sr=8-3&keywords=paint+strainer+bag+5+gallon
 

Orson Carte

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#6
As a matter of curiosity; if the seed-head is covered with a bag (prior to flowering), how does certain pollination take place?
I do appreciate that tobacco is 'self-pollinating' but do you have to do anything to 'help' the plant - such as artificially vibrating it? Or is the mere movement in the wind sufficient?
The main reason that I didn't bag my specimens was because (though I'm no gardener) I've been led to believe that the intervention of bees guarantees a far more complete pollination. But, then again, I may be misguided with this notion.
 

deluxestogie

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#7
Because of the shape of the tobacco flower, they are mostly pollinated by moths, hummingbirds and bumblebees. As for self-pollination, it has been estimated that 90% of pollination occurs within the maturing blossom during the last day just before it opens. No external actions are required.

Bob
 
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