Whole Leaf Tobacco

Saw this today

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Moth

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Norrlander

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Thanks everyone
Looks like we have a winner in n.sylvestris. They do smell quite pleasant, but not amazing.
So, any value in me surreptitiously nabbing some seeds? Bear in mind I only grow Burley at the moment, due to limited curing facilities.
 

Moth

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I was going to poorly paraphrase something Bob said to me on my first post.

Then I realised a direct quote would do it justice

To answer your question about N. alata and N. sylvestris, the first inhabitants of the New World had many thousands of years to discover uses for those two species. At least 2000 years ago, they chose N. tabacum and N. rustica to cultivate (along with devotees of N. bigelovii and N. quadrivalvis in the North American west--the latter being improved prior to smoking by frying in buffalo fat). Even within those two, primarily cultivated species, there are varieties that can present some really odd smells and tastes. Among the 72 or so species of the genus, Nicotiana, the mix and proportions of a half-dozen major alkaloids vary considerably. Some produce unpleasant or frightening symptoms. Blah. Blah...

I wouldn't bother with them as smoking material. They certainly won't make a decent cigar. [Maybe a truly odd cigar, if you're fond of them.] If they don't make you ill, they will surely taste awful
 

deluxestogie

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If I remember correctly, the two primary "parents" of Nicotiana tabacum were N. tomentosa and N. sylvestris. I have never tasted the latter, but @skychaser sent me some leaves of N. tomentosa that he had harvested and cured. I kilned them, then rolled a small cigar from it.



It was smokable, but not something I would go to the trouble of producing myself. While N. tomentosa is high in nornicotine, N. sylvestris appears to produce only nicotine as its major alkaloid (and a number of hybrids of N. sylvestris produce mostly nornicotine in the F1 generation).

Bob
 

plantdude

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Hi All!
I spotted this growing outside our local church. Anybody want to take a stab at identifying it? Wondering if I should keep an eye on it with a view to nabbing some seeds

View attachment 32518
Isn't contemplating stealing seeds from church some sort of sin... So, better yet, next spring give them some of your tobacco seeds to grow along with their flowers and offer to prune the plant for them;)

Those are pretty flowers.
 

plantdude

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Well, I'm always ready to take Bob's advice so the seeds will remain unmolested.
Nice to know I was able to spot a family member at a distance though (I never usually get this close to a church )
Ha, maybe it's time to start getting closer to a church if they are growing that:)
Churches get a bad rap anymore. Decent people trying to do better with their lives is what it comes down to - for the ones that are in it for the right reasons anyway. Nothing at all wrong with that and something we could do with more of in this world now a days.
 

Norrlander

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Decent people trying to do better with their lives is what it comes down to - for the ones that are in it for the right reasons anyway. Nothing at all wrong with that and something we could do with more of in this world now a days.
I absolutely agree, and am truly sorry if my tongue in cheek comment was misconstrued as an attack on either the faith or the institution. Good folk are good folk, no matter what. It just happens that I'm not of that particular faith.

Anyway, let's not drift too far off topic here, especially into potentially troubled waters
 

plantdude

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I absolutely agree, and am truly sorry if my tongue in cheek comment was misconstrued as an attack on either the faith or the institution. Good folk are good folk, no matter what. It just happens that I'm not of that particular faith.

Anyway, let's not drift too far off topic here, especially into potentially troubled waters
No worries from me and definetly no need to apologize. As much as it shames me to say it I have not set foot in a church in years. You did get me thinking on your original post, you being from Sweden and all. My mom's grandparents were Swedish immigrants (the other side was English/Irish). My mom thought the world of her Swedish grandma and grandpa and to this day in her seventies she can recite a version of the Lord's Prayer in Swedish that her grandmother taught her. Some good things get passed on. Just thought it was neat to think of a tie to her homeland still being alive and well today and how religon shapes decent people and society.
I suppose It was off the topic a little, but... Sometimes maybe it doesn't hurt to stop and smell the N. sylvestris;)
 
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