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Seed to Cigar: My journey to grow, harvest, ferment and roll my own cigars!

deluxestogie

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  1. Just cut off (and discard) the truly icky looking parts of any leaf
  2. mist the fuzzy molded stem areas with some peroxide
  3. then kiln all but the discarded stuff.
  4. Once it's done, you have a second opportunity to discard what doesn't look so good.
In general, if only a small portion of any particular leaf appears problematic, you can usually save and use the remainder of the leaf.

Bob
 

ChinaVoodoo

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I don't think any of those photos are mold. I would not smoke the ones with black spots. My assumption, by the look of the leaves, is that you either picked them too late, or piled them too long before hanging. It's some sort of breakdown of the leaf, but if it still tastes good, it should be safe.
 

Charly

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I agree with ChinaVoodoo, I don't see mold on your leaves either (mold is fuzzy, and can be easily removed), the brown spots are here because of excessive moisture (either piled for too long, or hanged in a moist place), I don't know if they are safe to smoke, but I have a lot of leaves that looks like yours.

I usually get this type of brown spots on leaves that have already dried a bit (in a dry space) and then get more moisture and dry slower on spots.
In a goup of leaves (same strains, same height, about the same maturity), I regularly get light colored ones, dark colored ones, and some light colored with darker spots.

I would discard the parts with "black" spots.

Ad Bob said : just remove the ugliest parts, you can always make your final opinion after the kilning.

The brown spots can be good, but you should check if the leaves are not already composted.
Here is what I do (with the leaves in case, not fully dry) :
- if the brown spots are as strechy and strong as the rest of the lamina, then I would save them,
- if the brown spots tear apart, then they are already composted, and I would discard them.

But again, I am not an expert, and I don't know if the brown spots are safe to use... if anybody have any info on this, I am interested.

P.S. After kilning, a lot of brown spots seem to disapear, the leaves get a more uniform color.
 

HercDriver

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I really appreciate everyone's replies. I have sourced a fridge to begin the hyper fermentation and Ill keep everyone updated on that build and how the leaves do.
 

deluxestogie

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Communication is predicated on a common understanding of vocabulary. I'm afraid I have no idea what you mean by hyper fermentation.

Bob

EDIT: Correction--I do have an idea, but that's not what it's called.
 

HercDriver

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We'll get on the same sheet of music then. (y)

"Kiln fermenting" is what I'm referring to.

Unless you have another term for it that I'm not aware of. :)

Communication is predicated on a common understanding of vocabulary. I'm afraid I have no idea what you mean by hyper fermentation.

Bob

EDIT: Correction--I do have an idea, but that's not what it's called.
 

deluxestogie

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It is true that the folks at the Large Hadron Collider were deeply concerned that the initiation of hyperfermentation might result in the development of tiny black holes within tobacco leaf. They wisely avoided the attempt, to the relief of Europeans.

Bob
 

HercDriver

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Hey everyone! Hope you guys had a great Christmas and New Year! Im still here. Just been slammed at work(s)!

I did manage to snag an old fridge to turn into a fermenter. Ill remove the shelving I dont need and drill holes for the fans and other items. You can see it next to my most important fridge. The beer fridge.

I did start a new batch of monsters. I started them now because I know they take a little bit to get bigger and I want them large enough to transplant outside after the last frost. That will also leave me enough time to hang them in the shad.

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Few shots from my desk.
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CobGuy

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Nice to see you back! :)

Good luck on this year's grow and thanks for the cool aerial photos.

~Darin
 

HercDriver

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It is true that the folks at the Large Hadron Collider were deeply concerned that the initiation of hyperfermentation might result in the development of tiny black holes within tobacco leaf. They wisely avoided the attempt, to the relief of Europeans.

Bob

Bob I just read through your book! Im definitely going to try a few of your pipe blends! Ive snagged a few blends and a few pipe accessories and Im eager to do some taste testing. If I ordered a softback book and sent it to you would you sign it for me?

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Nice to see you back! :)

Good luck on this year's grow and thanks for the cool aerial photos.

~Darin

Youre welcome! I enjoy sharing photos from work whenever I can.
 

deluxestogie

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If I ordered a softback book and sent it to you would you sign it for me?
I would be happy to. It seems like an awfully expensive decoration (with the postage) for a paperback.

Bob

EDIT: If you do purchase one, consider writing a review on the lulu.com site.
 
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