Whole Leaf Tobacco

smoking midrib?

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wazzappenning

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i tried mixing some of the midrib in, and yeah, theres a reason it usually goes in the trash. way too woody of a taste for me. either that or its got that fishy taste from having to wet it down.

i tried mixing more turkish in and that seems to work. definitely changes the taste. i usually only add trace amounts of burley, turkish and maryland to my virginia. so i took that mix and went half and half, then 2/3 to 1/3 then 3/4 to 1/4 turkish. all seem to taste less strong, but the higher amounts almost taste like an american cig. just a little something missing. i was thinking a little more burley would give it a little more cigar taste and make it taste like an american cig, but it seems to have dulled down the other flavors. ill keep playing around with different burleys.

i thought bright leaf was virginia.

stalk position is good to know, but hard to do with purchased stuff in a bag. ill try and keep track with my crop though.

two other ways of making it less strong are a little far fetched. 1 would be to find a rolling kit that could roll slims, the 2nd would be to figure out how to do the "rolls more" cut. other than using stems and stalks in commercial tobacco, this would be the other reason that real tobacco is too strong.

in canada, over 20 years back they started selling tins of tobacco that said "rolls 25% more" now were up to 100%. so i can buy 100g of tobacco and roll 200 cigs with it. its the way they cut it that makes it pack in there differently (im guessing with more pockets of air). i suspect that my old discount brand of cigs was using this cut. i consistently smoked those king size in less than 5 minutes. sometimes 3.

if they have this in the states (and i think they do), they probably dont really mention it. im sure someone has thought their old cigs took less and less time to smoke (especially discount brands)

i believe canadian cigs are made only of virginia, and i tried to make mine with the same (with trace amounts of other baccys). its good sometimes, and usually seems to take a day or 2 after shredding to be less strong (dunno why). still too strong to smoke at my regular rate.

this is my not too official source for what cigs are made of. at the bottom they describe every item. these guys were from the 80's, so no all canadians arent like them.

they say:seven packs of smokes - cigarettes; Canadian cigarettes are quite different from those sold in the United States--American cigarettes are made of a combination of burley, oriental and Virginia tobaccos blended with flavourings and casings, whereas almost all Canadian cigarettes are made from a single variety of Virginia tobacco grown in Ontario, with additives only added to paper and filter (not the tobacco).
http://aetherealforge.com/~aeon/humor/12days.shtml

sorry for the horribly long post.
 

Rayshields

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This is right . The lower leaves is what big tobacco buys all they can get and pays beter money . They are the trashy bottom leaves and bring more money than the top leaves do .

Larry, my ignorance is sometimes astounding...I would never have guessed this...I was considering trashing some of the lower leaves...once again this proves the old adage, "everybody is an idiot, if you find the right subject."
 

FmGrowit

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I read somewhere that the commercial processing of the stems includes "puffing" the stem. How this is done, I don't know, but if you put some under a vacuum and rapidly release the the vacuum, it should puff. Better results might be had if the stem is in a pliable condition.

A lot of stem is used for making wet snuff these days. Rustica stem is a big mover in commercial products.
 

leverhead

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I read somewhere that the commercial processing of the stems includes "puffing" the stem. How this is done, I don't know, but if you put some under a vacuum and rapidly release the the vacuum, it should puff.

I think it's the other way around, hold it at higher pressure and temperature then release the pressure suddenly.
 

wazzappenning

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so adding a third turkish and just a touch of burley seem to have fixed it up for me. we ran out of it while out of town during canada day long weekend, so i bought a pouch of the stuff i used to smoke. after trying to mix midrib in mine i now know what that commercial "discount" tobacco is. not sure much of it is tobacco at all. tastes woody and gives that kind of burning feeling on lips and tongue just like the midrib mix i tried. yuk.
 

BigBonner

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I read somewhere that the commercial processing of the stems includes "puffing" the stem. How this is done, I don't know, but if you put some under a vacuum and rapidly release the the vacuum, it should puff. Better results might be had if the stem is in a pliable condition.

A lot of stem is used for making wet snuff these days. Rustica stem is a big mover in commercial products.

They way I understand it , is big tobacco steams the mid rib . This causes it to swell and become very soft . They are flattened with rollers then re dried . They shred them just like the leaf .

Some stems and small leaf pieces are crushed up into dust and then put back together in sheets where they get shredded and added to the shredded leaf mix.
 

BarG

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Some stems and small leaf pieces are crushed up into dust and then put back together in sheets where they get shredded and added to the shredded leaf mix.

Holy sh.t don't tell me that. I smoked storebought my whole life. Just kidding. Why waste what don't need to be wasted. I been throwing my stems away because I got to many other things to learn right now. It might make a good hornworm house though, sheets of baccy with a little tiger moth pherome mixed in.
 

olivercramden

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Midrib Issue:
The "birds-eye" in birds-eye shag tobacco is the midrib on a bias-cut. Examples are: Gawith & Hogarth's Dark Bird's Eye, all the Bali Shag blends, and Samson Origional.
It was fictional character Sherlock Holmes fav (which was unpopular in Great Britain at the time) and is my all-time favorite cut.
Harsh Leaf Option:
On the issue of a blend or leaf that seems too harsh, sometimes a brand of tube with a more aggresive filter, (ex~Ramback Elite, or a 100mm tube with a 25mm filter)
may be all that's necessary to tame it down. (It's an easy option, anyway.)
Canadian FYI:
Canadian cigarettes, (Player's, Export A, Benson & Hedges for example) use Virginia grown "in country". The shorter season accounts for that characteristic mild flavor profile.
The climate here in SW WA State is similar to our Northern neighbors. I'd be thrilled if I could ultimately achieve the profile of Player's Navy Cut!
My experiment begins next season. Wish me luck. I've got 2 acres waiting for me to do something with.
I'm aware that my 1st efforts may not result in much, but I'm ready to dive in and start learning. Great site, great peeps!
 

leverhead

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Canadian cigarettes, (Player's, Export A, Benson & Hedges for example) use Virginia grown "in country". The shorter season accounts for that characteristic mild flavor profile.
The climate here in SW WA State is similar to our Northern neighbors.


I wonder what variety's of Virginia's they grow.
 

olivercramden

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I wonder what variety's of Virginia's they grow.
Until I started reading up on this forum, I had no idea just how many varieties of Virginia there were. It's mind-boggling! Just assumed it was Bright Leaf.
I'd be very interested in finding out, as well. I'll post any discoveries, if someone doesn't beat me to it.
 

FmGrowit

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Here's a lead.

Try not to use the word "Virginia" when referring to "Flue Cured". This can make your search results very confusing if you're looking for details.


While there are varieties of Flue Cured tobacco named "xxx Virginia" or "Virginia xxx", it does not necessarily mean they are Flue Cured varieties.
 
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FmGrowit

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[FONT=Arial, Helvetica]From Richner's seed company

Delgold is one of the best known varieties for commercial tobacco production. It was developed in Canada in 1980 by crossing wild tobacco (N. rustica) with two popular American varieties, Hicks Broadleaf and Virginia 115. The result was a high-yielding, high-nicotine cultivar that was widely adopted by growers. Delgold is still considered one of the better yielding flue-cured varieties available. The plant is characterized as light green and quick growing. .
[/FONT]
 

jeapadrenaline

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Well thank you don.
I think delgold will be one of my grow varieties next year if i can gwt the seeds. Skychaser on htgt grew a bunch this year so if nobody here has them, i will contact him to see about getting some seed.
 

olivercramden

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Here's a lead.

Try not to use the word "Virginia" when referring to "Flue Cured". This can make your search results very confusing if you're looking for details.


While there are varieties of Flue Cured tobacco named "xxx Virginia" or "Virginia xxx", it does not necessarily mean they are Flue Cured varieties.
Appreciate the tip. I definitely had it backassward! I always thought of "Flue-Cured" as a process, not a product; and used primarily, but not exclusively, on "Virginia" varietals.
Your info on Canadian was just what the physician prescribed. Thank you. I raise a PBR in your direction, and shotgun it, in your honor, Good Sir.
 

Chicken

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^^^

your gonna insult him by raisng a PBR....

you should toast him with a BUSCH,,,beer,lol
 

FmGrowit

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Here are some examples of "Virginia" tobacco which are not Flue Cured varieties.

VIRGINIA 12...Cigar filler

VIRGINIA 310...Fire Cured

I think there are more, just can't find them right now.
 

FmGrowit

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Here's a link to the different "Classes" of tobacco. These classes are more commonly referred to as "Types", but while there are only 11 Classes, there are 73 types...almost all exclusive to a geographical location. These boundaries are ancient industry standards that home growers need not recognize, but the vocabulary should be maintained to eliminate confusion.
 

olivercramden

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Here's a link to the different "Classes" of tobacco. These classes are more commonly referred to as "Types", but while there are only 11 Classes, there are 73 types...almost all exclusive to a geographical location. These boundaries are ancient industry standards that home growers need not recognize, but the vocabulary should be maintained to eliminate confusion.
FmGrowit, I agree, the primacy of proper terminology is beyond dispute. I'll definitely be spending time at those excellent links you provided. They not only clear up previous misconceptions, they're an invaluable resource!
Again, I'm in your debt, Good Sir!
 
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