Whole Leaf Tobacco

Stalk Position and Acidity

Tobaccofieldsforever

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I was curious if Oriental tobacco follows the same inverse proportionality of acidity vs. stalk position (lower position=higher acidity) that Virginia follows? Does this also apply to tobaccos that are more alkaline in nature? For example would a dark or burley tobacco produce more alkaline leaves toward the bottom of the stalk and less alkaline ones toward the top or does this only apply to acidity? Thanks for any help.
 
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ChinaVoodoo

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I'm not sure what's going on here. Also, I haven't read on this topic. So we'll certainly wait for a better answer. But.... Upper leaves seem to be more alkaline to me.... on every strain.
 

Tobaccofieldsforever

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I'm not sure what's going on here. Also, I haven't read on this topic. So we'll certainly wait for a better answer. But.... Upper leaves seem to be more alkaline to me.... on every strain.
ok, sorry I think I just asked a stupid question thinking that for some magical reason only virginia type tobacco plants would have that characteristic. I guess I was just trying to understand WHY lower leaves are more acidic and upper leaves are less acidic (more alkaline). I was thinking that acidity is a defining characteristic of virginias and it is higher at bottom and lower at top. Alkalinity is a defining characteristic of Dark tobacco so maybe is higher at bottom and lower at top, if that helps to explain my thinking. I was thinking stalk position affects the tobaccos defining characteristics in the same way rather than acidity and alkalinity the same way across the board if that makes any sense at all...haha.
 

ChinaVoodoo

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This is a totally valid question. I think I was a little confused about the question.

Lower leaves have less protein. Protein when burned releases ammonia. Therefore, lower leaves are less alkaline. This holds true for all types.
 

Tobaccofieldsforever

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This is a totally valid question. I think I was a little confused about the question.I

Lower leaves have less protein. Protein when burned releases ammonia. Therefore, lower leaves are less alkaline. This holds true for all types.
Interesting, thanks! So this leads me back to the idea of toasting which I have yet to do. I read some of the things you posted about toasting @ChinaVoodoo , and there were some graphs and other information showing large spikes in the release of ammonia at relatively high temperatures (the peak of the first reaction was around 375 F I believe) I know this is off topic, but I just find it interesting myself. Do you think it would be wise to even attempt to toast tobacco in a conventional oven at home at such a hight temperature? Would I just end up scorching it and rendering it useless? The tobacco in a cigarette is burning around 1,202 degrees F on average when someone is smoking, so maybe toasting at 375 F for a short time would yield interesting results...only one way to find out for sure..ha.
 

ChinaVoodoo

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Interesting, thanks! So this leads me back to the idea of toasting which I have yet to do. I read some of the things you posted about toasting @ChinaVoodoo , and there were some graphs and other information showing large spikes in the release of ammonia at relatively high temperatures (the peak of the first reaction was around 375 F I believe) I know this is off topic, but I just find it interesting myself. Do you think it would be wise to even attempt to toast tobacco in a conventional oven at home at such a hight temperature? Would I just end up scorching it and rendering it useless? The tobacco in a cigarette is burning around 1,202 degrees F on average when someone is smoking, so maybe toasting at 375 F for a short time would yield interesting results...only one way to find out for sure..ha.
Most of what I posted on that topic was conjecture. I think someone just needs to try it. I think there's also some diagram floating around that says 140°C which is close to 300°and near the beginning of that spike.
 
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