• Dear Guest,

    We've been using a forum format called vBulletin for over seven years and the program is no longer being developed, so that means no more updates or security patches. vBulletin has never been compatible with search engine optimization and it does not support the multitude of various devices most people use to access the internet, so it's time to say goodbye to vBulletin.

    For these reasons we have moved our forum to a new format that will support and encourage growth for the next generation of grower and DIY tobacco users.

    So please post any issues you're having with using the new site.

    As usual, you may login with your old password.

Northwood seeds

Starting Seed Late

NRustica

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 7, 2012
Messages
259
Likes
7
Points
0
Location
Beautiful Lake of the Ozarks
#1
Sometimes someone comes to the group this time of season or later and wonders if they can still plants some tobacco with success. I've been growing tobacco in MO for the last 7 years and I can tell you heartily, yet you can still start.

What I have found that works well for me is to start them in flats outside.

You simply put individual seeds on one of those 72 cell starters in each cell, just a couple. Put them in the east where they get morning sun but under the eaves of the house so they don't get pounded by rain before they start sprouting. Don't worry about putting the dome on.

You're going to want to get a sprayer with a mister setting and mist the tray first thing in the morning and if possible once they are in the shade. If they have to wait till you get home from work it's still doable.

Once they start sprouting if you have two or more seedling in a cell cut them down to one. Once they are 2"+ high transplant them into some soil you've already worked up making sure the ground is real loose for the roots to quickly spread out.

You may want to look on craigslist for people wanting to get rid of rabbit poop. Rabbit poop isn't hot and can go directly on the soil around the plants.

Good luck and God bless!
 

deluxestogie

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
May 25, 2011
Messages
13,076
Likes
2,089
Points
113
Location
near Blacksburg, VA
#2
I believe that in cooler regions, the problem that arises with late planting is the unfavorable weather conditions during the time that you are attempting to color-cure the leaf. Assuming a rapid germination and time to transplant of only 4 weeks (which I consider optimistic), you will need an average of 55 to 65 days to get to a point when you have usable leaf. To make seed will require at least another month of above freezing weather.

In the above scenario, if you start seed on June 1, you might be able to get plants into the ground on July 1 (again, optimistic). So early September is when leaf may be harvestable. If weather in mid September is ideal for color-curing, then you're home free. Otherwise, shed curing presents a problem with cooler weather that may or may not be overly humid.

Pests tend to appear in seasonal cycles. Early plantings vs. late plantings usually differ in pest problems. As an example, my 1 May plantings suffered far less from early insect damage than my 1 June plantings.

I certainly agree that it is possible to start this late and get something worthwhile. But you may be fighting the onset of frost or other troublesome conditions. If a new grower is intent on starting this late, I would suggest making it a small grow, to minimize the loss and frustration if everything doesn't turn out happily.

Bob
 

Knucklehead

Moderator
Founding Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2012
Messages
8,795
Likes
399
Points
83
Location
NE Alabama
#3
Sometimes someone comes to the group this time of season or later and wonders if they can still plants some tobacco with success. I've been growing tobacco in MO for the last 7 years and I can tell you heartily, yet you can still start.

What I have found that works well for me is to start them in flats outside.

You simply put individual seeds on one of those 72 cell starters in each cell, just a couple. Put them in the east where they get morning sun but under the eaves of the house so they don't get pounded by rain before they start sprouting. Don't worry about putting the dome on.

You're going to want to get a sprayer with a mister setting and mist the tray first thing in the morning and if possible once they are in the shade. If they have to wait till you get home from work it's still doable.

Once they start sprouting if you have two or more seedling in a cell cut them down to one. Once they are 2"+ high transplant them into some soil you've already worked up making sure the ground is real loose for the roots to quickly spread out.

You may want to look on craigslist for people wanting to get rid of rabbit poop. Rabbit poop isn't hot and can go directly on the soil around the plants.

Good luck and God bless!
It depends on where you live. I have a buddy in Canada with a 90 day growing season. One method to determine if it's too late to start seed is to find out the earliest frost date for your area: http://fairtradetobacco.com/showthread.php?781-Last-and-First-Frost-Date-When-Is-It-Really . Determine how many days are left in your grow season and what the days to maturity is of the variety you are planting. Days to Maturity is figured from transplant to 50% of plants with one flower. Add to that the 6-8 weeks it takes a seed to be ready for transplant.
 

johnlee1933

Moderator
Founding Member
Joined
Aug 21, 2011
Messages
3,974
Likes
172
Points
0
Location
Near Danbury, CT
#4
I certainly agree that it is possible to start this late and get something worthwhile. But you may be fighting the onset of frost or other troublesome conditions. If a new grower is intent on starting this late, I would suggest making it a small grow, to minimize the loss and frustration if everything doesn't turn out happily.

Bob
I completely agree. I was fortunate my first year to have enough heated space where I could control humidity to get a small color cure. For a larger grow I would have been out of luck.
 

NRustica

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 7, 2012
Messages
259
Likes
7
Points
0
Location
Beautiful Lake of the Ozarks
#5
It depends on where you live. I have a buddy in Canada with a 90 day growing season. One method to determine if it's too late to start seed is to find out the earliest frost date for your area: http://fairtradetobacco.com/showthread.php?781-Last-and-First-Frost-Date-When-Is-It-Really . Determine how many days are left in your grow season and what the days to maturity is of the variety you are planting. Days to Maturity is figured from transplant to 50% of plants with one flower. Add to that the 6-8 weeks it takes a seed to be ready for transplant.
I've found that the amount of time to transplant is a little quicker this late in the season, closer to 3 weeks to transplant. But that's here in Missouri.
 

janetta007

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 12, 2013
Messages
240
Likes
12
Points
0
Location
Palestine,TX
#7
Started seeds July 17. Thank you leverhead for my first grow. Just one note, standing over them 24/7 will not make them sprout faster. LoL But I think I see a sprout starting. Yeah Me. Thanks to deluxestogie's forum on how to grow. I also used NRustica's approach a week later because I did not think the others had survived. Hopefully I will get a plant for seed to start next year.
 

janetta007

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 12, 2013
Messages
240
Likes
12
Points
0
Location
Palestine,TX
#10
You're going to want to get a sprayer with a mister setting and mist the tray first thing in the morning and if possible once they are in the shade. If they have to wait till you get home from work it's still doable.

The second seeds I started this way have just started to sprout. But with the heat here in East Texas I find myself misting it am and pm. I think I will call him "Sprout"
 

janetta007

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 12, 2013
Messages
240
Likes
12
Points
0
Location
Palestine,TX
#11
Well this darn Texas heat has killed all but 1 of my sprouts. They very fragile. I couldn't start the seeds inside due to I had already had the tray with veggie seeds in it. So now I will just pout and read forums till the seed bank opens next year to request seeds.
 

Knucklehead

Moderator
Founding Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2012
Messages
8,795
Likes
399
Points
83
Location
NE Alabama
#12
It's best to water from the bottom. Use the 1020 cells with a solid bottom tray. Remove one of the cells and put a couple of quarts of water in the bottom tray. The water will wick up into the cells. This helps prevent soil compaction, and encourages the roots to go down seeking water. When your seedlings are really small, it may help to have them in the shade with indirect sun light. Later, you can slowly introduce them to full sun over the course of a week or longer. This is part of the hardening off process in preparation to transplant. You would also want to cut water and fertilizer at this time to help drought proof them for several days.
 

workhorse_01

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 10, 2012
Messages
1,959
Likes
69
Points
0
Location
Waycross,Ga.
#13
How did the new seeds start?
Well this darn Texas heat has killed all but 1 of my sprouts. They very fragile. I couldn't start the seeds inside due to I had already had the tray with veggie seeds in it. So now I will just pout and read forums till the seed bank opens next year to request seeds.
 

janetta007

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 12, 2013
Messages
240
Likes
12
Points
0
Location
Palestine,TX
#14
I got the seeds to germinate good. They are in cell trays now, but they don't look like they are growing any. They are still on the two leaf sprout still. I have them outside on the covered back porch letting them get some indirect sun. I am watering from the bottom as directed. I will dig out my computer cord to upload some pics so everyone can give advice as to what I am doing right or wrong. Maybe I am just impatient.
 

Aaron

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 2, 2012
Messages
452
Likes
9
Points
0
Location
Canon City CO
#15
Seedlings grow slower them more you look at them. Ok, maybe not, but they do grow really slow. Give them a couple more weeks and they should start growing. At seedling stage most of the growth is happening underground.
 

leverhead

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2012
Messages
3,079
Likes
99
Points
48
Location
Grimes County Texas
#16
They are in cell trays now, but they don't look like they are growing any. They are still on the two leaf sprout still....
They're making roots, it will take a few weeks for the leaves to catch up. They'll do similar at transplanting, just not as extreme. By spring you'll be ahead of the game having this behind you.
 

janetta007

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 12, 2013
Messages
240
Likes
12
Points
0
Location
Palestine,TX
#20
Well I got a little growth on them but I do not think they should be this small. May be the heat. Should I put them in direct sun or no? These where taken Sept. 3rd Sprouts ssept 2.jpg

These where taken today DSCF0977.jpg DSCF0978.jpg DSCF0979.jpg DSCF0980.jpg
 
Top