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Super Blood-dripping Strawberry Lunar Eclipse May 2021

deluxestogie

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Here is a clickable map of the eclipse:


Basically, all of our members except those in NZ and Australia are out of luck. North America will get a "partial" (i.e. "not an") eclipse in the wee wee hours of 26 May. In NZ and Australia, this will be a typical lunar eclipse the evening of 26 May.

Maybe if this event had managed one more silly adjective, more of us might have been able to see it.

Bob
 

deluxestogie

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Penumbral begins:May 26 at 4:47:39 am
Partial begins:May 26 at 5:44:58 am
Local max:May 26 at 6:02:44 am
Moonset:May 26 at 6:05:36 am


I awakened at 4:45, though not to see the moon. But there it was, shining through the closed blinds. I got dressed, went outside (in 60°F temp), and enjoyed a few minutes of a bright moon in the quietness of still air. No vehicle noise. No chirping. No crickets. No mosquitoes. (Even the cicadas were a bust this year.) Then a bank of continuous cloud cover eased in from the west, darkening the sky. I went back to bed.

People sleep less at the full moon.

Bob
 

deluxestogie

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The advanced publicity for these relatively common lunar events has reached a fevered pitch over the past few years. Bored (paid by the word) journalists dredge up millennium-old names for various seasonal moons--from Old England, from colonial Europeans, from displaced, indigenous tribes . During those pre-calendar, pre-clock epochs, knowing that a particular moon was the "corn planting moon" or the "green corn moon" or the "harvest moon" was useful, in a crude, planning sort of way. Some of these identical, cute names were applied to multiple months by different cultures. Never mind. If the publisher pays by the word, then it's another word or three.

Super moons (closer to Earth) happen regularly. Before all the recent hoopla about them, I can't say that I ever really noticed the difference--during over 7 decades of looking up. But alas, we live in an age of hyperbole and exaggeration. It's absolutely a perfect storm of devastating dialog among the free-range stakeholders, and sounds like an organic, sustainable freight train.

Bob
 
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