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The Metric System Discussion

deluxestogie

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#23
The Rabbit Hole of Construction Nail Sizes in the US

In the United States, the length of a nail is designated by its penny size, written with a number and the abbreviation d for penny; for example, 10d for a ten-penny nail. A larger number indicates a longer nail...
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Penny sizes originally referred to the price for a long hundred nails in England in the 13th century: the larger the nail, the higher the cost per long hundred. The system remained in use in England into the 20th century, but is obsolete there today. The d is an abbreviation for denarius, a Roman coin similar to a penny; this was the abbreviation for the monetary penny in the United Kingdom before decimalisation.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Penny_(unit)

The long hundred, great hundred, or twelfty is the "hundred" of six score (120) used in Germanic languages prior to the 15th century. The number was simply described as hundred and translated into Latin in Germanic-speaking countries as centum (Roman numeral c.), but the qualifier "long" is now added because present English uses the word "hundred" exclusively to refer to the number of five score (100) instead.
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The long hundred was 120 but the long thousand was reckoned decimally as 10 long hundreds (1200).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long_hundred

"I would like to purchase 10 pounds of the size nail that cost ten pennies in 13th century England for a count of the "hundred" used in 15th century Germany, please."

Bob
 

CobGuy

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#26
Here's some unit conversions you may not have heard of ... :)

2000 pounds of Chinese soup: Won ton
Time between slipping on a peel and smacking the pavement: 1 bananosecond
Ratio of an igloo's circumference to its diameter: Eskimo Pi
Half of a large intestine: 1 semicolon
1000 aches: 1 megahurtz
1000 grams of wet socks: 1 literhosen
1 millionth of a fish: 1 microfiche
8 nickels: 2 paradigms

~Darin
 

Orson Carte

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#29
And let’s not forget furlongs!
Ten chains to a furlong or eight furlongs in a mile.

Pier
You make it all sound too easy.
Don't forget that there's also Rods and Links to consider, with 4 rods to a chain, and 25 links to a rod.
And this leads naturally into measuring land area in acres, roods and perches - a perch being one square rod. (Very uncomfortable for most roosting birds)
I could also tell you a little about half an acre - but it's altogether too rood.
 

Moth

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#30
Dare I mention shoe sizing?

The UK shoe size is based on a barley corn, and defined the "Foot" measurement (after the king's shoe size, what else eh?)

"The British shoe sizing system was created by Edward II in 1324 and that sizing system is still used to manufacture footwear for the UK.

The King's system is based on the size of a barleycorn.

The Romans had used the barleycorn as a measurement for years, so the King agreed that that system made perfect sense. Each barleycorn measures 1/3 of an inch and 36 barleycorns placed end to end was the size of Edward's foot, his shoe size was labeled 12.

The British shoe sizing system starts at 0 and then it increases 1/3 of an inch for whole sizes and 1/6 of an inch for half sizes. So if a child's shoe size is 1 that equals one hand and one corn.

A hand equates to 4 inches, which is still used to measure horses.
"

https://www.internationalshoesizes.com/british.htm
 
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