Whole Leaf Tobacco

Toasting Temp

davek14

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I'm trying to mellow Burley for pipe tobacco. I don't like the "toasty" flavor from baking at all. I've been casing the leaf with honey and stoving it by putting it pretty moist in a bowl in a crock pot full of water and running it on high for hours. The water boils so I guess I'm getting around 212F of moist heat. then I dry it crispy (no oven) and re-moisten. It mellows it a lot but not as much as toasting. No burnt taste however. I have no clue what I'm doing, just trying to get a lot of heat on it for any reactions which might take place.

So, what reactions might be occurring? Any ideas? Am I just getting the reaction while smoking it only?
 

deluxestogie

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What is the history of this leaf? Is it home-grown? Is it aged, and how much? Has it been kilned?

The Crockpot/steamy method is likely making it into a Cavendish, which is essentially steam-cooked tobacco.

Bob

EDIT: Straight burley in a pipe requires more of a man than I am.
 

davek14

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It is BlgBonner's "aged Burley", not kilned I believe. It *is* formidable unaltered. I'm mixing it with different stuff. A little Bright Leaf (BB) helps mellow it as well and adds a nice tang. Toasted, it is a nice mixer which takes on the flavors of other stuff. Trying to achieve that without the burnt taste.
 

deluxestogie

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I've rolled puro cigar from BB's red tip burley, but usually after kilning. In a pipe, I enjoy pure burley in a corncob, but not in a briar. Since corncobs have a much larger diameter smoke hole, I suspect that there is a combustion temperature difference.

At the moment, I'm smoking a bowl of the "Semibreve" blend that I recently posted. It's just half Lemon and half burley Cavendish. It has a bit of a bite when moist, but is tamer when well dried.

Bob
 

davek14

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Right now I'm off work due to carpal tunnel surgery. Just about a week ago I got dextrous in both hands, now I'm working on strength. So now I can tinker light stuff like throwing tobacco together. I'm pretty scattershot at the moment putting things together in small amounts to try with what I have. I'm learning some generalities though. I've learned quite a bit from this site.

One thing which is funny is how quickly the toasted Burley melds. You can add it to a blend and get an idea of taste, and by that evening it has melded quite a bit. Usually a couple days at least is needed to begin to marry.

It's funny you would say that about the cob. I've found the same to be true. I smoke cobs mostly but I often try things in a briar or a clay if they are not stellar at first. It can make a big difference. I always thought the absorptive abilities of the different pipes was a big thing. Never thought about bore size and combustion temperature. Makes a lot of sense with this sugar reacting with the freebase nic thang going on.

I guess I'm wondering about what reactions might occur in treating the tobacco vs what occurs while smoking. I'll have to surf a bit on cavendish today.
 
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