Whole Leaf Tobacco

deluxestogie

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
May 25, 2011
Messages
17,708
Points
113
Location
near Blacksburg, VA
Burge,
The Wikipedia article is lengthy and detailed. A lot of info there. I would be cautious about anything that sounds truly definitive on the topic of cigars. As you know, opinions vary widely on most aspects of cigars--witness this forum. And anyone can edit a Wikipedia article, inserting his or her own favorite interpretation. (e.g. Stating that cigar binders are made from ligero leaf is clearly an odd stance.)

But it's a good read.

Bob
 

burge

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 11, 2014
Messages
1,289
Points
83
Location
Alberta
I did some reading that suggested that Spain had a influence on North American tobacco development and may had some help via the coffee trade. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_tobacco. If you read on the history of coffee the aribica beans were developed by the ottoman Empire. Turkish tobacco would be a interesting read.
 

hooyoo

Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2020
Messages
13
Points
13
Location
PA, USA
Been doing some research on indigenous N. tabacum landraces. Ancient landraces cultivated by Native peoples in the center of origin for a particular crop tend to have huge genetic diversity and unique qualities not found anywhere else (see: founder effect). Tobacco seems to be tricky since it's been moved around and replaced everywhere, but if there was a place where you'd find some original genetics, it would be here. I'd love to know if anyone here has grown out and tested any of these USDA accessions:


PI 116568 from Costa Rice: "Chircagre, an Indian village at the foot of the Irazú volcano. Interesting for its resistance to adverse conditions and its ease of cultivation."
-----------------

PI 106576 from Guyana: "This pink flowered tobacco, from 2-5ft high, is cultivated by the Indians and gives a better crop than American varieties.
Name ("Yure") given by the local Arawak people whom grew this variety."
Note: considering that the Taino inhabitants of Cuba, the DR, and Puerto Rico were an Arawakan people, this might be an ancient Arawak landrace of tobacco similar to what may have been grown in pre-Columbian times.
-----------------

PI 106958 from Guyana
"A native strain collected at Rupununi by Carib indians."
Note: as with the above variety, I wonder if this might be similar to the tobacco cultivated throughout the Caribbean before European colonization.
----------------


PI 112776 from Chiapas, Mexico: "Seed sifted from contraband tobacco sold by Indians in the market. Said to be grown in small patches about Chiapa."
------------------


PI 112682, 'Tobaco Montés' from Oaxaca, Mexico: "Collected off of the surface of a leaf for sale. Cultivated in highlands about town by Zapotec Indians."
-----------------


PI 112594, 'Macuchi'(?) from Mexico: "Seed from store whose supply is brought from San Juan del Rio (Durango)."
Note: Macuchi is the word for tobacco in a handful of Native languages in Mexico, particularly in the Durango region. Huichol people have an ancient tradition of using macuchi tobacco in religious rituals.

 

hooyoo

Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2020
Messages
13
Points
13
Location
PA, USA
Also for what it's worth, Cuban 'Criollo' is essentially an 'improved' Taino tobacco variety as well. I wrote up this article on it earlier this year, based largely on all of the really fascinating things that I've learned from everyone here at FTT.

 
Top