Whole Leaf Tobacco

Tobacco variety ? And Malaysian traditional tobacco

Tobaccomy

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Hi guys, I’m new here... look up a lot about tobacco variety’s

Would like to share about the local tobacco in Malaysia, from tasek village, Terengganu. It’s a form of pressed and fermented tobacco which has a really distinct flavour and aroma.. nicotine content is also noticeable... usually we smoke it the leaves from the ‘nipah’ tree Or sugar palm tree, which sounds Stone Age but believe me it really gives a speacial flvour to the smoke unlike the regular paper. I personally only use the leaves now since it’s very unique in taste...


So here’s the question, I got the seeds from a local farmer here and planted it.. was wondering what variety it is ? Is it ornamental , Virginia, burley ? ,

there’s a huge variety of tobacco in Malaysia with various different flavours and taste notes... was wondering if anyone knows what variety this is ?
3E8E5338-D055-40BB-9ED1-CCA0CEF54F7C.jpeg
 

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deluxestogie

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Welcome to the forum. The long, pink blossoms indicate that this is smoking tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), but beyond that, assigning a variety is difficult. From the green stems in the distance photo, it does not look like most burley, though it still could be. In the close-up photo of a single leaf, the central vein appears whiter, which might suggest a burley. The very narrow leaf lamina at the base of each of the long, pointed leaves suggests that it may be derived from Orinoco. That is, I would guess it might be a Virginia variety. But some leaves (in the distance photo view) appear to have a lamina-free stem base, known as a petiole. Petiolate leaves are more often seen on Oriental varieties.

Beyond that, you should understand that there are over 3000 named varieties of tobacco. It is usually impossible to identify a particular variety from photos, though some might be ruled out. Perhaps you could ask the person from whom you obtained the seed.

Bob
 

Tobaccomy

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Welcome to the forum. The long, pink blossoms indicate that this is smoking tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), but beyond that, assigning a variety is difficult. From the green stems in the distance photo, it does not look like most burley, though it still could be. In the close-up photo of a single leaf, the central vein appears whiter, which might suggest a burley. The very narrow leaf lamina at the base of each of the long, pointed leaves suggests that it may be derived from Orinoco. That is, I would guess it might be a Virginia variety. But some leaves (in the distance photo view) appear to have a lamina-free stem base, known as a petiole. Petiolate leaves are more often seen on Oriental varieties.

Beyond that, you should understand that there are over 3000 named varieties of tobacco. It is usually impossible to identify a particular variety from photos, though some might be ruled out. Perhaps you could ask the person from whom you obtained the seed.

Bob
thanks for the reply, so it could be either one of those ya... was really wondering.. the people here would never know which variety they just plant and sell :LOL:
 

deluxestogie

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There are also a host of varieties grown in Indonesia that we seldom see in the US. If the local folks near you collect seed from open-pollinated plants, then they are all likely hybrid varieties.

Bob
 

deluxestogie

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I suppose that another matter to consider is that with pressing and fermentation, much of the difference between varieties comes down to their nicotine content, rather than subtle aroma differences and specific curing methods.

Bob
 

Tobaccomy

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I suppose that another matter to consider is that with pressing and fermentation, much of the difference between varieties comes down to their nicotine content, rather than subtle aroma differences and specific curing methods.

Bob
oh so basically the taste of all types of tobacco will be the same fermented flavor and the nicotine content is the only thing that stands out ?
 

ChinaVoodoo

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Welcome to the forum.

I enjoy seeing the processes from your part of the world. Thank you for sharing.

Perhaps @Tutu, or @Leftynick might recognize this plant.

Many of the forum members do various types of fermentation. Mostly through the use of a kiln to heat the leaves to around 120°F for a time.

Some others make compressed sticks we call carrottes.

Some do a wet fermentation under pressure to make a tabacco called Perique.

Overall, fermenting tobacco other than cigar varieties in the West is very uncommon and its mostly hobbyists like us who do it.

All cigar manufacturers and suppliers ferment their tobacco in large piles which heat up under their own pressure.

Is this tobacco of yours shredded and then cured in the sun before fermentation?
 

deluxestogie

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so basically the taste of all types of tobacco will be the same fermented flavor
That is not what I am saying. Every variety of tobacco will produce its own, subtle difference in flavor, aroma and acidity, when fermented. Fermentation methods themselves differ significantly. BUT compared to simple air-curing and aging, fermentation methods do tend to decrease the varietal distinctions.

Bob
 

Tutu

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As others have mentioned, best would be to ask your source for the name of the variety.
From there onward you can start deducting what it really is.
My first guess would also be Virginia, but I don't have too much experience with Virginia.

Where I lived (Kedah) there wasn't much tobacco grown, but I've seen a field in Perlis of which I also thought it was Virginia.
Unfortunately I wasn't able to find the owner of the field.

Selamat datang ke forum ini bro.
 

Tobaccomy

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As others have mentioned, best would be to ask your source for the name of the variety.
From there onward you can start deducting what it really is.
My first guess would also be Virginia, but I don't have too much experience with Virginia.

Where I lived (Kedah) there wasn't much tobacco grown, but I've seen a field in Perlis of which I also thought it was Virginia.
Unfortunately I wasn't able to find the owner of the field.

Selamat datang ke forum ini bro.
wow you lived in kedah before ?? have you tried the tembakau jawa ? its the in thing there imported from indonesia.. not bad its taste tobacco sprayed with sugar and dried. Ya but its quite impossible to ask for variety actually they dont really know these things in villages ;)
 

Tobaccomy

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What is the procedure for fermentation over there?
over here they shred tobacco finely, sun cure them and add them to plastic bags, stuff them into bamboo compressed and then leave it for 2 months + , taste not bad but less flavour compared to the basic sun cured tobacco
 

Tobaccomy

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Welcome to the forum.

I enjoy seeing the processes from your part of the world. Thank you for sharing.

Perhaps @Tutu, or @Leftynick might recognize this plant.

Many of the forum members do various types of fermentation. Mostly through the use of a kiln to heat the leaves to around 120°F for a time.

Some others make compressed sticks we call carrottes.

Some do a wet fermentation under pressure to make a tabacco called Perique.

Overall, fermenting tobacco other than cigar varieties in the West is very uncommon and its mostly hobbyists like us who do it.

All cigar manufacturers and suppliers ferment their tobacco in large piles which heat up under their own pressure.

Is this tobacco of yours shredded and then cured in the sun before fermentation?
most welcome bro, me too i like seeing how people process tobaccco around the world, its real artwork especially when it comes to flavour.. i can only get tobacco closest to my region, tried indonesian sulawesi tobacco once from a friend, out of this world buddy.. lovely, its claled ico ugi. thanks for the info on fermentation
 

Tobaccomy

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That is not what I am saying. Every variety of tobacco will produce its own, subtle difference in flavor, aroma and acidity, when fermented. Fermentation methods themselves differ significantly. BUT compared to simple air-curing and aging, fermentation methods do tend to decrease the varietal distinctions.

Bob
oh ok... nice .. thanks for the info :)
 

Tobaccomy

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over here they shred tobacco finely, sun cure them and add them to plastic bags, stuff them into bamboo compressed and then leave it for 2 months + , taste not bad but less flavour compared to the basic sun cured tobacco
i forgot to mention, the tobacco is left overnight to get some moisture before its put into the bamboo..
 

Leftynick

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Welcome to the group fellow Malaysian. Is this the famous tembakau madu (honey tobacco) from Terengganu? I never tried it but it really famous among Malaysia traditional cigarette smoker.
As for the variety, I dont think we can find real variety of our traditional tobacco. Like Bob said, it is open pollinated therefore it is a hybrid tobacco. Some not really trusted website said that our tobacco are burley type. Some said it is derived from Kasturi seeds from Indonesia. But the tobacco is sun cured, rajangan style like Indonesian tobacco.
You said that this type of tobacco fermented in bamboo so it might taste like ico bugis tobacco, except the ico bugis is cased with palm sugar and fire cured inside the bamboo.
You said you have the seeds so I assume you want to grow your own. I used to plant my own tobacco, but current situation didn't allow me to. I might plant again sometime in the future. You might see my past grow log if you are interested in this forum.
 

deluxestogie

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Here @Tutu's a thread on Kasturi:


Bob
 

Tobaccomy

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Welcome to the group fellow Malaysian. Is this the famous tembakau madu (honey tobacco) from Terengganu? I never tried it but it really famous among Malaysia traditional cigarette smoker.
As for the variety, I dont think we can find real variety of our traditional tobacco. Like Bob said, it is open pollinated therefore it is a hybrid tobacco. Some not really trusted website said that our tobacco are burley type. Some said it is derived from Kasturi seeds from Indonesia. But the tobacco is sun cured, rajangan style like Indonesian tobacco.
You said that this type of tobacco fermented in bamboo so it might taste like ico bugis tobacco, except the ico bugis is cased with palm sugar and fire cured inside the bamboo.
You said you have the seeds so I assume you want to grow your own. I used to plant my own tobacco, but current situation didn't allow me to. I might plant again sometime in the future. You might see my past grow log if you are interested in this forum.
ya its from terengganu.. must be indonesian variety i believe, but nonetheless taste is good so ok lah :giggle:, but im looking also for oriental tobacco.. tried once from terengganu, very2 aromatic but hard to get the seeds... maybe will have to oder online .. im growing some tobacco now.. hopefully its ok, raining season quite difficult to get a good grow, but not transplanted yet lets see how.. thinking of opening a grow blog.. i usually use this terengganu tobacco/kelantan and sabah tobacco as well... real nice, rasa berlemak... huhu.. for me its the best lah.. have rolled cigars with my tobacco as well.. hoping to get a good grow this time... what did you grow before ?
 

Tobaccomy

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Here @Tutu's a thread on Kasturi:


Bob
wow a really informative post... nice to see how things are there
 
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