Whole Leaf Tobacco

totaly noob requesting help

preniumscigs

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Hello , I did grow tobbaco for the first time
I actually have some yellow leaf on the bottom of the plants
I made them dry 1 week, so i decided to smoke some...
Well 1 week wasn't enought because after smoking 3 cigs i had a small headaches... Noob i am ahaha
So then i decided to go to a forum because i don't want to do stupid things again
So how long do i need to dry? And then how do i cure my tobbaco, without any heating
thanks in advance for your advice I want them to be smokeable at least so i havent done all this for no reason.
After all my research i will not smoke those leaves again until i know what i am doing.
Ps: im french sorry for my english mistakes.
Jay
 

deluxestogie

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Welcome to the forum. You should read the new growers's FAQ (link at the top of the page) and browse the Index of Key Forum Threads (link also up top).

In very general terms, air-cured tobacco requires weeks to months to fully color-cure. The leaf may still not be ready to smoke at that point. A lot depends on the variety that you are growing.

Bob
 

ChinaVoodoo

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Welcome from Edmonton,

I am going to briefly describe air-curing. I do recommend, like deluxestogie, that for further questions, you take a look at the Key Threads section. If you want to know about sun curing or flue curing, you should take a look in there. Flue curing is much more advanced and there is already lots of info about it in the forum.

In short, for air curing, the tobacco must be yellow before drying it out. This means that you must either not pick it until its yellow, or pick it just as its beginning to turn yellow, and let it dry slowly. In Quebec, that may just mean hanging it in your shed. It should be between 65%-75% relative humidity and 15-30°C. At higher humidity, it is helpful to have a lot of airflow to prevent mold.
 

preniumscigs

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Welcome from Edmonton,

I am going to briefly describe air-curing. I do recommend, like deluxestogie, that for further questions, you take a look at the Key Threads section. If you want to know about sun curing or flue curing, you should take a look in there. Flue curing is much more advanced and there is already lots of info about it in the forum.

In short, for air curing, the tobacco must be yellow before drying it out. This means that you must either not pick it until its yellow, or pick it just as its beginning to turn yellow, and let it dry slowly. In Quebec, that may just mean hanging it in your shed. It should be between 65%-75% relative humidity and 15-30°C. At higher humidity, it is helpful to have a lot of airflow to prevent mold.
i have a shed for drying , and i did only pick yellow leaf, how long needed to be dry? and thanks i will read about flue curing
 

deluxestogie

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how long needed to be dry?
It will dry when it dries. The issue is whether or not it has fully cured. By leaving the yellowed/brown leaf in the shed, allowing daily swings in ambient humidity to affect it, the leaf continues to cure. Burley usually is not ready until late November. Some other varieties are smokable sooner. Many require that they continue to cure for 9-12 months. A tobacco kiln can shorten than to about a month.

Sun-curing may shorten the entire curing process to a few weeks. Flue-curing completes it in 5 days.

Bob
 

preniumscigs

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It will dry when it dries. The issue is whether or not it has fully cured. By leaving the yellowed/brown leaf in the shed, allowing daily swings in ambient humidity to affect it, the leaf continues to cure. Burley usually is not ready until late November. Some other varieties are smokable sooner. Many require that they continue to cure for 9-12 months. A tobacco kiln can shorten than to about a month.

Sun-curing may shorten the entire curing process to a few weeks. Flue-curing completes it in 5 days.

Bob
i have read about flue curing is it really hard to build? seems like a lot of step to build that and my uncle with me growing the tobbaco could be very helpfull to build that but he doesnt speak english :/
 

ChinaVoodoo

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In Alberta, I have found that flue cured tobacco is the best quality versus all other tobacco that I have produced. The strain, the type or kind of tobacco that it is necessarily must be a flue cured type. Also colloquially known in Canada as Virginia tobacco.

Do you know what type of tobacco you are growing?

I recommend you get the basics down this year by air curing. Take your time getting to know the process. Next year, try flue curing. That's just my opinion, though.

If autumn is warm and sunny, and not too dry, you can sun cure. It's fairly easy to set up, but you don't want hot and dry or cold and wet weather. Something like this :

IMG_20180919_113537748_HDR_3.jpg
 

preniumscigs

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Messages
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In Alberta, I have found that flue cured tobacco is the best quality versus all other tobacco that I have produced. The strain, the type or kind of tobacco that it is necessarily must be a flue cured type. Also colloquially known in Canada as Virginia tobacco.

Do you know what type of tobacco you are growing?

I recommend you get the basics down this year by air curing. Take your time getting to know the process. Next year, try flue curing. That's just my opinion, though.

If autumn is warm and sunny, and not too dry, you can sun cure. It's fairly easy to set up, but you don't want hot and dry or cold and wet weather. Something like this :

View attachment 27971
Hi, I am growing virginia gold , I have alot and alot of plants. I am tempted to try Flue curing to have some sooner to smoke , and i would let some cure with air, I just have to read more about flue curing...
For air curing i have couples greenhouse empty. Anyways like i said i am noob to tobbaco so i want to learn ... Thanks ;)
Jay
 

deluxestogie

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flue curing is it really hard to build?
Despite the complex drawings for constructing a flue-cure chamber, all you need is the following:
  • a container or shed that is sufficiently insulated
  • a way to hang the tobacco as separate leaves (no stalks)
  • a circulation fan
  • a source of heat that can allow the container or shed to reach 165°F.
  • a way to adjust (or control) the temperature
You can generally ignore the humidity within the container, if it can ventilate.



Bob

EDIT: Leaf is put into the flue-cure chamber green or starting to yellow. It comes out 5 days later completely cured.
"Dry Bulb Temp" is the temperature from a normal thermometer.
 

preniumscigs

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Despite the complex drawings for constructing a flue-cure chamber, all you need is the following:
  • a container or shed that is sufficiently insulated
  • a way to hang the tobacco as separate leaves (no stalks)
  • a circulation fan
  • a source of heat that can allow the container or shed to reach 165°F.
  • a way to adjust (or control) the temperature
You can generally ignore the humidity within the container, if it can ventilate.



Bob
so i dont dry the leaves i just cure them, right ? once i pick them a litte yellowish?
 

deluxestogie

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Leaves that go into a single run of flue-curing should be at a similar ripeness, to get a consistent cure. They all can be entirely green (but mature), or all can be partially yellowed.

Bob
 

preniumscigs

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Messages
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Location
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Welcome from Edmonton,

I am going to briefly describe air-curing. I do recommend, like deluxestogie, that for further questions, you take a look at the Key Threads section. If you want to know about sun curing or flue curing, you should take a look in there. Flue curing is much more advanced and there is already lots of info about it in the forum.

In short, for air curing, the tobacco must be yellow before drying it out. This means that you must either not pick it until its yellow, or pick it just as its beginning to turn yellow, and let it dry slowly. In Quebec, that may just mean hanging it in your shed. It should be between 65%-75% relative humidity and 15-30°C. At higher humidity, it is helpful to have a lot of airflow to prevent mold.
And with that , how long does it take for a full quality tobbaco?
 
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