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Northwood seeds

Touching them makes them hard...

BigBonner

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#22
I am not overly fond of humans therefore I do not anthropomorphize. However if an organism reacts to threats they are by definition conscious.

And I will agree it has a downside, especially when it comes to thinning seedlings or harvesting.
I wonder what my tobacco plants are thinking when I pull that rope on my lawn mower and start rolling it down my plant beds , cutting off the top leaves ?
If they are screaming the I won't hear them overtop of the mower.

After a few days you can't hardly tell I mowed them and will have to do it again . About four trimming then they are ready to plant .
 

BarG

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#24
I am not overly fond of humans therefore I do not anthropomorphize. However if an organism reacts to threats they are by definition conscious.

And I will agree it has a downside, especially when it comes to thinning seedlings or harvesting.
Your wierd dude.
 

Smokin Harley

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#27
I was reading a gardening book the other day that was referring to growing from seed (general, not tobacco related). Something it suggested was lightly touching new seedlings every day with either your finger or running a sheet of paper across a planting tray. Apparently this helps the seedlings to harden up and do better when transplanted. Does anyone have any thoughts on this?
a small fan blowing on low on tiny seedlings does the same thing, and hardens them to wind for when you get them in the ground.
 
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