Whole Leaf Tobacco

Uses for stalks

Nathan Esq

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So what do you guys do with the stalks after a grow? I've heard if making mojo from stems, but is there any use for stalks?
 

deluxestogie

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Tobacco stalks are soft in the center. When they dry out, they are hollow and fragile, and useless for craft projects. Tobacco stalks and roots can harbor tobacco pathogens over the winter. If used for mulch, I would allow it to fully dry after shredding, then apply the tobacco waste mulch to non-solanaceous veggie beds, avoiding use as a mulch for new tobacco or for other solanaceous plants (e.g. avoid using on tomato, eggplant, potato, etc.).

The walking sticks I have seen advertised were made from the wood "tobacco sticks" used for spearing and suspending tobacco stalks in a curing barn, rather than being made from tobacco stalks.

Bob
 

deluxestogie

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If the internal temperature of the compost is high enough (I don't know the value), then overwintering pests are killed. But this would require a compost thermometer (long shaft) and monitoring.

Bob
 

cotillion

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I'm going to be using mine for snuff soon. I'll lightly toast them, grind them and pass them through some stainless mesh screening I have. Then add some sodium carbonate and water or flavouring liquid. I might try it with Jack Daniels Honey liqueur.

Edit: didn't read the title properly, it's the stems I'll be using, not stalks lol.
 

GreenDragon

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But...but...but how do you light the splinter?

B...B...Bob
First, dig a pit in the ground. Then stack a large pile of firewood, starting with pine on the bottom, then various hardwoods into the pit. Make sure to leave plenty of air spaces between logs. Pour gasoline, kerosene, etc on the pile, stand 20 feet away, light a Roman Candle firework with your trusty twin jet flame cigar lighter, aim at the pit and wait to hear a huge BOOM! Let the wood burn down to hot coals. Take two splinters and, holding like chop-sticks, pick up a small glowing ember and bring carefully to the end of your cigar. Voila! Nothing could be simpler!
 
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