Whole Leaf Tobacco

What Pipe or Pipe Tobacco Did You Smoke Today? [pics]

Sid.Stavros

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When Andrew Briggman, a young soldier in the US invasion of Afghanistan, witnesses other recruits killing innocent civilians under the direction of a sadistic leader, Sergeant Deeks, he considers reporting them to higher-ups but the heavily-armed, increasingly violent platoon becomes suspicious that someone in their ranks has turned on them and Andrew begins to fear that he’ll be the next target.



I am smoking Cornell and Diehl Cordial while watching The Kill Team (2019) movie.
 

Charly

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Tanzania meerschaum. A self-made blend from my local tobacconist: 2 parts toasted Virginia, 3 parts golden Virginia, 2 parts of some kind of burley, 1 part perique. Warm sunny day with the heater going. Bacon on the bbq, followed by eggs.
Nice looking blend !
Beautiful picture !
BBQ and snow ! Two things I usually don't see together (y)
 

LivinInPiperHell

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Newminster #17 English Luxus

radfords vario 404 bent saddle $31.70.jpg

Radfords Vario 404

In for another hot muggy day - 35*C/95*F - leading up to another heat wave where it will hit the 40*C +
for a few days.
Those of you in the Northern Hemisphere have probably had enough of the cold. I'm dead set over the heat, especially since it recently turned humid.
 

deluxestogie

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Tanzania meerschaum
I became curious about how recently these pipes have been manufactured. I couldn't find an answer to that question, but stumbled into some interesting info:

Yours looks like a Kiko:

In reading that they also supplied their meerschaum to GBD, I did discover that a somewhat blocky bulldog meerschaum that I've owned for eons is also made from Tanganyika meerschaum. I vaguely recalled one of my pipe being branded as GBD. I looked at the bulldog meer, but couldn't find a logo at all. After some spit and polishing of the base of the bit, there it was. An oval containing "GBD" is now barely visible, in just the right tangential light.

So I own three altogether--all from ages past. Two of them have military-style bits, which I am certain have been swapped out several times over the decades. The third is the GBD bulldog, with a screw-in bit.

[You're never too old to learn something-ish.]

Bob

EDIT: Oh! I forgot about the kit meer that I carved into a corncob, that broke its shank later on, and that I finally repaired. It bears a fading elephant logo on the original stem base. So that's a Kiko. I never knew that. So I have four of them!
 

ChinaVoodoo

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I became curious about how recently these pipes have been manufactured. I couldn't find an answer to that question, but stumbled into some interesting info:

Yours looks like a Kiko:

In reading that they also supplied their meerschaum to GBD, I did discover that a somewhat blocky bulldog meerschaum that I've owned for eons is also made from Tanganyika meerschaum. I vaguely recalled one of my pipe being branded as GBD. I looked at the bulldog meer, but couldn't find a logo at all. After some spit and polishing of the base of the bit, there it was. An oval containing "GBD" is now barely visible, in just the right tangential light.

So I own three altogether--all from ages past. Two of them have military-style bits, which I am certain have been swapped out several times over the decades. The third is the GBD bulldog, with a screw-in bit.

[You're never too old to learn something-ish.]

Bob

EDIT: Oh! I forgot about the kit meer that I carved into a corncob, that broke its shank later on, and that I finally repaired. It bears a fading elephant logo on the original stem base. So that's a Kiko. I never knew that. So I have four of them!
Thanks Bob. It's cool to learn more about these pipes.

I also have one just like this that i bought at an antique shop in London. I don't know where it is exactly, so I took the photo from the Kiko wiki.

edit: seem to be having a problem with uploading.
 

LivinInPiperHell

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Another Dr Plumb pipe for first time of day - unfortunately no pic, don't know how to upload pics from my phone [why I use the sellers pics]

A gifted Dr Plumb 3/4 Bent Dinky 'pocket pipe' - Formers Birds Eye Flake.
 

deluxestogie

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Repairable but not Restorable



This poor old Tanganyika Meerschaum carve-a-pipe, which I made into a corncob a half-century ago, eventually lost its shank, leaving a crater in the side of the bowl instead. To make things even more challenging, the bit sported a permanently frozen, corroded alloy screw tenon (which originally screwed directly into the meerschaum, rather than into a sleeve of any kind), and it was no longer usable as a screw, nor was it long enough to provide stable support for the pipe, when padded and pressed into a mortise. But I did not want to lose the bit's iconic logo.

To repair the bowl, I bored the crater to accept a bamboo shank. This was a tight press-fit, and was epoxied in place. The wide margins of the crater were filled in with a spackle of 50% plaster of Paris to 50% fine sand--a combination that is fireproof, and does not shrink with drying.

The screw tenon was heavily wrapped with Teflon tape, then forced into the bore of the bamboo shank. A shoulder on the tenon could not be fit into the mortise without boring the bamboo to unacceptably thin walls. So there is a collar over the shoulder. Although I could devise a number of ways to permanently attach the bit to the shank, their abrupt difference in bore would require periodic disassembly for cleaning.

My solution to having a stable mortise/tenon joint that would be removable, was to use a short section of poly-olefin heat shrink tube. It is quite stable, once it has been shrunk with a hair dryer. When the crud inside the shank cries out for cleaning, the heat shrink will be cut with a knife, and peeled off. Afterwards, a new section of it will be reapplied.



Up close, you can see that the heat shrink tube is fairly thick stuff.

Altogether, this is not a pretty pipe. Perhaps its bailing wire and kite string look is in keeping with the corncob tradition. But it is a capacious, cool-smoking pipe, saved from a dustbin it so richly deserves. (Or maybe I should just change the elephant icon into a woolly mammoth icon.)

Bob
 
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