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When paper molding, does book work better than entubado?

Twilliger

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Hi all, I am over the 20 stick threshold now and continuing to enjoy very much and appreciate all the wisdom and demos found here!

I am utilizing the paper mold technique and plan to continue doing so. I started out using book bunching and have been trying to transition into entubado bunching. The problem I am encountering is that the draw is too light. When I book bunch the draw is on the light side when tested at binding but tightens up through wrapping and drying. With my first 3 entubado's the draw has not tightened up enough. I have been trying to bind as tightly as I can.

So, have experienced paper molders had success with entubado bunching? If so, any hints appreciated. Is it even possible to roll entubado too tight when not molding?
 

MarcL

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Let me suggest after tubing, give the filler a good squeezing in the hand before binding.
Also, if your filler is to dry, it can be harder to achieve sufficient compression.
Try additional molding either over what has been molded or, with a fresh re-molding. Press harder downward on it while molding.
You can make it to tight and, I say do it so you'll know what it takes. You can redo it. If it dries to much, re-prep it so it works.
 

Mathaious12

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I had the same issue when I first started, I've only rolled entubado. Part of my solution was increasing the case of the binder so I could roll tighter from the start, the other part was focusing the pressure on the bunch and not the binder to not crack the binder. Then, when I applied the paper mold I tried to compress the bunch as much as possible again. I've never gotten a stick with paper mold to a point where I would say the draw was tight. I think that's the point of entubado, to have a good easy draw.
 

Twilliger

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thank you for the suggestions - and the belief - I will keep at the entubado - I just started adding Ligero and I think one of the issues may have been the viso was too dry. I haven't cased any filler to date but I think I will case the viso a touch when I next roll (tomorrow), it was cracking as I tried to roll it. And I will add more elbow grease. Thanks again.
 

Twilliger

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I keep my filler in the bags they come in, if they start feeling too dry I spray a few shots of distilled water into the bag, sealing it by rolling the ends and using a clothes pin...this bumps the casing up just right usually.
thanks DePasta - To date I have been keeping filler in the original bags sealed as you described. I have not spritzed into the bag (only had about 5 weeks now) but I may try that. The corojo 98 viso has become to dry to tube. I have been spritzing the leaf the tiniest I can about 10 min before rolling.

Rolled two more today, following tips from Marc and Mathaious above, felt a bit tighter so we will see how they turn out.
 

Jim D

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My sticks aren't the prettiest but I still need the filler to not break when bunching.

I have found it beneficial to spritz my dry fillers and bag them separately from the stored leaf in order to prep it for bunching. I don't want to risk getting the whole pound overly hydrated for storing, but need the 5 or 6 leaves of each variety more pliable than the stored leaf.

When my stored leaf starts getting too dry to safely separate leaves for use, I'll spritz a leaf and put it back in the bag for storage. This seems to add just enough humidity to prevent overly dry storage conditions.

The hardest part for me initially was having the patience to let the spritz soak in. I have found it necessary to spritz, bag, and walk away to do other stuff while the leaf absorbs moisture or I'll be damaging my leaf(breaking and tearing it) while bunching.

In another train of thought, you can control the tightness of the draw in the head of the cigar. Meaning if you were to taper the head, then when you cut the cap, you control the diameter of the opening and thereby can impact the draw. Most of my paper molded cigars come out more torpedo shaped than parejo, so I can simply cut the head to the desired draw.

Hope this helps, talk to you again soon,
Jim
 

Twilliger

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Thank you all for the help - my RYO have dramatically improved! Really squeezing that bunch both in the hand and when binding has worked very well. The cigars are burning much better, tunnelling and relights have really decreased with my last two rolls - I might just be getting the hang of this:)
 
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