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Wind and rain caused my plants to lean over...

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mwaller

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Can I just stake them back up?
Fortunately, it's only one variety (Vuelta Abajo) that seems to be falling over...
 

Jitterbugdude

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Yup, Go out and re- straighten as soon as possible. You can use stakes or just mound dirt around them. Even wedge a big rock at the base if you need to. The longer you wait the more crooked they will become.
 

deluxestogie

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For a number of years, I identified specific varieties that tended to blow down. What turned out to determine which plants were likely to blow down was their location. Those that were planted at the prevailing windward edge of the garden (for me, that's WNW during the summer months) took the brunt of strong gusts. I've got giant corn at that edge of the garden this season, so I expect my corncob corn to blow down, before any of the tobacco.

Bob

EDIT: One other factor is worth mentioning. I began growing tobacco in "double-dug" beds. That is, I was tilling the soil (by hand) down to about 24". This works spectacularly for vegetables, and allows a higher planting density and dramatically increased yields. With tobacco, it just increases the likelihood that plants will blow down. Now, I till down to about 12".
 

mwaller

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Interesting. The Vuelta Abajo are in the middle of the bed, so there is no particular reason that they would get any more wind than the neighbors. In my case, they just have a more spindly habit than others. It appears that the stalk is bending - roots stay planted.
 

greenmonster714

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I too have had what you are describing. The plants are not big yet but some that have larger leaves that do get tipped over in the heavy rains and wind. In the past I've had plants blow over and such. I did either two things. Ignore them and let them repair themselves or if they had a stake like a tomato. I'd prop them back up. Its amazing how well a plant will repair any damage. Unless they are snapped off completely they usually mend themselves rather well. Even becoming stronger and more vigorous in growth. I'm not to sure how delicate a tobacco plant is but I'm willing to bet they can bounce back. I've read a few of Tutu's threads and the heavy rains and wind he gets in the tropical weather forces him to deal with blow downs a lot.

They are all small at this point though. I'm not sure how I will react when a full sized one blows over...lol. Probably just stake it if needed. I've got a little protection from the tree line but not a whole lot.
 

deluxestogie

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I forgot to mention that a bagged plant (one with a giant sail at the very top) has a target on its back. Over the years, I've had two fully grown plants snap off at the ground during a storm. Both of these had bud bags in place. In one additional plant, a storm topped it. It had already been bagged, so I had to wait for a sucker to bud, and bag the sucker for seed.

On the happy side, my 14' tall Colombian Garcia plants swayed like palms in a hurricane, but never surrendered.

20 second video

Bob
 

Jitterbugdude

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If you plan to prime your plants a crooked stalk is no big deal but if you are going to stalk cure them it really is difficult to hang crooked stalks. They take up a lot more room
 

greenmonster714

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If you plan to prime your plants a crooked stalk is no big deal but if you are going to stalk cure them it really is difficult to hang crooked stalks. They take up a lot more room

Yeah, I guess that would pose a problem. I'm not sure what to stalk cure but if it did have a crooked stem I guess you could make the one bent into two if needed. I dunno, so many things to learn..lol. but a good point to mention. I've already got pages of log notes on this grow and I find myself writing a lot.
 

greenmonster714

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I forgot to mention that a bagged plant (one with a giant sail at the very top) has a target on its back. Over the years, I've had two fully grown plants snap off at the ground during a storm. Both of these had bud bags in place. In one additional plant, a storm topped it. It had already been bagged, so I had to wait for a sucker to bud, and bag the sucker for seed.

On the happy side, my 14' tall Colombian Garcia plants swayed like palms in a hurricane, but never surrendered.

20 second video

Bob

Very good point Bob. I'm glad you mentioned that. Now I'm thinking maybe it would be a good idea to at least stake the bagged plants. 14' man that's a big plant. I can see why you've got them against the wall kinda protected.
 

deluxestogie

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Most cigar leaf is primed. I make an exception for certain varieties that seem to mature as an entire plant (Criollo, Swarr-Hibshman, Little Dutch, Dutch Ohio, Long Red). Burley, Maryland and CT Broadleaf are traditionally stalk-harvested. Virginia's that will be flue-cured must be primed.

If I don't know, I just watch the maturation. If it seems to go in a slow, steady progression up the stalk, then I prime the leaf.

For some varieties, I prime just the lugs (often with burley), since they will become trash by the time the entire plant is ready to be cut.

Bob
 

mwaller

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So, we've had another few days of cooler, drizzly weather. Each day, I find another 1-2 plants bent over. Oddly enough, when I go to prop them up with a stake, they seem quite stiff and 'set' in their crooked position. What could be causing this? Do I need more of some nutrient in the soil to keep them strong and upright?
 

Brown Thumb

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They do that real quick. Mash the roots down and leave the stalk the way it is if the plant straightened up again.
I gave up on steaking up plants a few yrs. ago.
If the plant is real stubborn and don't want to stand upright I just put a boulder on the roots to keep it upright.
 

BarG

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Tobacco is like corn, wind will lay them over but even left alone they will straighten up. I Started leaving both to right themselves unless they are special. The wind does that to me every year.

edit: my [brain freeze] orientals would look like a u straightening back up. You might have some lugs in the dirt. When I say straighten up I mean reach for the sky from their current position.
 

mwaller

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So, this looks a bit better than in the morning, but it illustrates the behavior I see. The growth tips are literally pointing at the ground... ????
 

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ChinaVoodoo

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This situation reminds me of when folks walk into the tobacconist, and ask what the pipe cleaners are for, and you start counting on your head, 1...2...3..., and then they exclaim their embarrassment.

Mwaller, the growth tip isn't referring to the tips on the leaves. (At least that's all I see that's pointing at the ground). It's referring to the central stalk of the entire plant.
 

mwaller

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I don't understand what you are describing. In the photo, the growth tip appears to be pointed straight up.

Bob
I this particular pictures, the growth tip is pointing to the left. Earlier in the day, it was point straight down at the ground. The leaf that is pointing straight up is NOT the uppermost leaf on the plant.
Perhaps a moot point, since this morning, the same plant seems to have straightened itself out. Still a mystery to me why this is happening.
 

ChinaVoodoo

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Has it been really cloudy? Give it time. They know what to do. The color and texture of your plants look great, so it's unlikely to do with soil. They're healthy. You're in WA. It's a sure thing. It's nothing to worry about.
 
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