Whole Leaf Tobacco

Yellowing leaves

Tricomike

Active Member
Joined
Jun 14, 2020
Messages
25
Points
13
Location
new jersey
I watched a good video where the guy would pile his leaves then wrap in towels to yellow them. He would rotate the pile twice daily and dab any moisture of the leaves. After about a week the leaves were a nice banana yellow then he hung to cure. Was wondering if anyone here has tried this method and how did it work out?
 

docpierce

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 10, 2019
Messages
112
Points
63
Location
norcal
Interesting method. Seems legit. Might be too labor intensive for any amount greater than a few plants.

For my part, I tend to look to old books and am especially attentive to simple methods from well documented sources.
I like to put my trust in methods that our wily and observant grandparents had their success with. Yootube videos are really help too, though.
 

Radagast

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2020
Messages
189
Points
63
Location
Canada
I watched a good video where the guy would pile his leaves then wrap in towels to yellow them. He would rotate the pile twice daily and dab any moisture of the leaves. After about a week the leaves were a nice banana yellow then he hung to cure. Was wondering if anyone here has tried this method and how did it work out?
Would you send me a link to that? I'd love to watch it.
 

Oldfella

Oldfella
Joined
Nov 27, 2019
Messages
360
Points
93
Location
Far North New Zealand
I watched a good video where the guy would pile his leaves then wrap in towels to yellow them. He would rotate the pile twice daily and dab any moisture of the leaves. After about a week the leaves were a nice banana yellow then he hung to cure. Was wondering if anyone here has tried this method and how did it work out?
I watched the same video. Seems to work,but maybe to much work. I prefer the cardboard box method. It's tried and proven.
Cheers Oldfella
 

Radagast

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2020
Messages
189
Points
63
Location
Canada
The guy in this video seems like he may be trying to tap into that old banana trick (supposedly if you put a ripe banana with unripened fruit, it somehow causes them to ripen). I've been wondering if that trick is applicable in the tobacco ripening process but have been to embarrassed to ask.
 

deluxestogie

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
May 25, 2011
Messages
16,454
Points
113
Location
near Blacksburg, VA
The increased rate of ripening from banana peels within a closed container is due to the release of methane from the banana peels. Ripening fruit naturally releases methane, which serves to synchronize ripening.

I actually tried that with green tobacco within a closed, steel trash can. I noticed no difference in rate of ripening the tobacco.

Bob

EDIT: ethylene...ETHYLENE is the correct gas emitted from ripening fruit. Methane is what is released from a brain fart.
 
Last edited:

Oldfella

Oldfella
Joined
Nov 27, 2019
Messages
360
Points
93
Location
Far North New Zealand
I don't use newspaper. I don't even use a box. I prefer to hang tobacco right away, but life rarely let's me, so I pile everything on the counter and throw a tarp over it. Rotate piles every couple days. I'll get to hanging when I get to it.
Probably be a zillion ways of yellowing leaves, I guess it's whatever works for you.
Cheers Oldfella
 

Knucklehead

Moderator
Founding Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2012
Messages
9,596
Points
113
Location
NE Alabama
I see pile/box curing as a tool in your toolbox. If your humidity is really low, it is an excellent way to yellow leaves that would otherwise dry green. I had to use it one season during a drought when the humidity went way down. The other times I could just hang the leaf in the shop. If you have a huge crop, hanging is much easier if your climate allows it. If your humidity is high, be sure to rotate the leaves more often. I didn’t watch mine close enough and some of the lamina turned black with rot and the stems turned soft and spongy with rot and it happened in a hurry. Mold wasn’t an issue but rot was. My main problem was user error, so just keep an eye on it. As Charly said, it’s usefulness as a technique may depend on conditions and climate.
 

Oldfella

Oldfella
Joined
Nov 27, 2019
Messages
360
Points
93
Location
Far North New Zealand
I see pile/box curing as a tool in your toolbox. If your humidity is really low, it is an excellent way to yellow leaves that would otherwise dry green. I had to use it one season during a drought when the humidity went way down. The other times I could just hang the leaf in the shop. If you have a huge crop, hanging is much easier if your climate allows it. If your humidity is high, be sure to rotate the leaves more often. I didn’t watch mine close enough and some of the lamina turned black with rot and the stems turned soft and spongy with rot and it happened in a hurry. Mold wasn’t an issue but rot was. My main problem was user error, so just keep an eye on it. As Charly said, it’s usefulness as a technique may depend on conditions and climate.
I would agree with that. I really only need to do the cardboard box thing in winter. The leaves would never yellow otherwise, and green baccy tastes yuky.
Cheers oldfella
 

Darkthirty

Active Member
Joined
Jul 27, 2017
Messages
32
Points
8
I use 2X2X2 cardboard boxes. Dump them in 2 days, pull out and hang the yellow and shuffle the stack. Open paperclips so they look like an S, pierce the stem with one end then hang them on wire. Stems take a month to dry down, so you gotta watch for mold. I'm usually swamped with work that time o the year and box curing is fast and reliable. Watch for hornworms, they can ruin a lot of leaves in the box!
 
Top