Whole Leaf Tobacco

more smoky smoke

Oldfella

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What difference could one itty bitty carbon atom possibly make? propylene glycol vs. ethylene glycol
It's an interesting thread if nothing else. But I still don't know, why more smoke???
If the cured tobacco is not producing it there maybe something wrong with his process.
Oldfella
 

ChinaVoodoo

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It's an interesting thread if nothing else. But I still don't know, why more smoke???
If the cured tobacco is not producing it there maybe something wrong with his process.
Oldfella
This is a good question. Mister augusto is also the author of other riveting threads such as glycol or glycerol, topping for burley, and the infamous glycol amount. Methink that he hath a tempered love for the leaf itself and is thus trying to improve it.

To each their own, I suppose.
 

augusto

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I tried to add 1% and 1/2% glycol improved flavor in general, a kind of sweetness not related to the single leaf (this happens with commercial tobaccos because their sweetness is made up of 2 elements, one the sugars that improve the burley, and the humectants that refine the whole) adds a good flavor but leaves a certain stickiness in the mouth that annoys. I want to see if it's the same with glycerin. I refer to the less flat smoke (I don't put sugars)
 

Ifyougotem

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Greetings, augusto. Though a good personal understanding of the available casing options and their usefulness in adjusting the characteristics of tobacco is quite useful (and with regard to pH adjustment, I believe essential- my own investigations/experimentation are ongoing in this area), rather than looking for chemical "tricks", you'd likely be much better served by examining the quality of the leaf you're smoking, and making a change to product which does not taste intrinsically "flat" to you. If you can find some quality leaf and adjust the pH properly, typically by application of mild food-grade acidic solution, you'll likely get smoke which tastes (actually mostly smells) good and is in no way flat or lacking aroma. Good wine can not be made out of mediocre grapes, but only with good grapes- no matter the skill or experience of the vintner. True, somewhat decent wine can sometimes be made from inferior grapes by various manipulative treatments, but the results will always be much less enjoyable compared to a product that begins with quality raw materials. I think that's probably the real source of your dissatisfaction. You can roll 'em fatter too, of course. I thought your thread was going to be about someone looking for fire-cured tobacco.
 
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