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Oh, Rats!

new boy

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This is a little off topic from tobacco, but I've noticed other people have posted threads on rat problems in the past. I usually don't have issues with trapping them but this year I've wound up with an especially smart rodent(s) that has got into the garage and proceed to eat a hole in the wall and spit out large amounts of insulation. Judging by the size and copious amounts of turds it leave everywhere there appears to be at least 1 fairly large rat. I've tried mouse traps, rat traps, sticky traps, and even the careful use of poison (contained and inside the garage with the garage remaining shut except to pull the car in or out). I've used cheese, cracked corn, peanut butter, and honey roasted peanuts for bait (which usually works very well in the backyard) but haven't even gotten a sprung trap yet. I've got an indoor cat, but she wouldn't know what to do with a rat.

This rat is doing some damage and I'm concerned it may eventually make its way up into the attic, which worries me since I replumbed the hot water lines in our house with PEX (plastic tubing rodents are known to chew through occasionally). I also kiln my tobacco in the attic and don't want the rat up there smoking my tobacco:)
Does anyone have any tips for baits or traps or even poison for hard to kill rats (i.e. rats more intelligent than myself)? Unfortunately shooting them isn't an option in the garage - this rat has been smart enough to not show itself regardless of the time I go out there anyway.
Chocolate on the traps is good or liquorice. I have poison with aniseed sits like drug for rodents gives them the munches
 

Ifyougotem

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Alright, here it is. (Disclaimer: The following depiction, true to the best of my honest recollection, contains giant rodent violence which some readers my find upsetting.)

When I was 6 years old I went to visit my grandparents in New Jersey during the summertime. Yep, New Jersey. On a beautiful, sunny afternoon we went to a country fair / carnival type of to-do, and they had the usual ring-toss games, snack booths, clowns, and all that. They had a petting zoo, where kids could interact pleasantly with cute, docile farm animals. They had nice rabbits (very soft and fluffy- I think angora maybe); they seemed to enjoy being handled, stroked, etc. They had little piglets, which were nearly hairless, and kinda squirmy. They had a sheep (an also fluffy and gentle ewe.) A short distance past the petting area there was a circular pen, made of wooden slats- perhaps 5' tall and 15' or so in diameter. This aroused my curiosity. A closer investigation didn't reveal much, as the slats were tightly fitted. The pen had hinged gate, which was full-height and secured with a padlock. Standing on my tippy-toes and peering over the rim of the pen, I saw a brown, quadrupedal animal about the size of a Labrador retreiver, and similarly boxey around the muzzle. Looked like a giant beaver, but no paddle tail. (The beavers I'd seen in cartoons were always friendly and industrious, and never tried to bite any of the other cartoon characters with incisors the size and sharpness of carpenter's chisels.) It was all by its lonesome, and I thought it might like to make friends like the other nice animals. As it turned out, that was a mistaken assumption on my part. Being a fairly nimble climber, I pulled myself up, got a leg over, then plopped down into the pen to meet my new friend (mistake #2.) It retreated to the far side of the pen, but didn't appear particularly agitated. I took a slow step toward it (constituting, of couse, mistake #3), and the enraged animal, without warning and with surprising speed, darted straight at me, attempting to sink its teeth in my mid-shin. It never made a sound, but moved quick as a snake and bared its prodigious choppers, while glaring menacingly. By the grace, this was in 1970, and like a lot of people then, I had on bell-bottom jeans. The rodent's fangs got caught in my pant leg, and as I attempted to retreat (letting loose a clamorous wailing/ caterwauling) it started thrashing from side to side, like a terrier shaking a rat- then it tore loose from my pant leg, we both went to our neutral corners. I was half-way over the fence when a man who had heard the commotion helped left me out of there. Then I caught he'll for being where I shouldn't have been, and learned that it was called a capybarra, and came from S. America. Truth is stranger than fiction. Finis,

ifyougotem
 

Charly

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I can only imagine how hard this situation must have been to face for a child... I am glad it didn't end too bad.
 

Ifyougotem

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Brief after-notes:

Technically, a circular area (unless one wishes to consider abstractly an infinite number of indefinably small ones) has no corners- neutral or otherwise. I wrote figuratively, of course. Have worked through this early trauma, I think successfully. Even wear an OSU T-shirt occasionally, emblazoned with the likeness of Bennie the Beaver, their mascot, with prodigious incisors prominently displayed. He seems a lot more formidable to me (I'm sure most would agree) than a silly little duck (even though U of O usually win more games.) No bad dreams anymore or shakes- feeling good, thank you.
 

Ifyougotem

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The cassowary is a bad-ass bird. I was attacked by one once. Kidding! (about the second comment). Hey plantdude, you said a rat or rats actually chewed through concrete at your house. Now that's scarey. I did not know that they could do that- just how much concrete did it/they actually chew through? (Might have to modify survival bunker dimensions.)
 

Ifyougotem

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ChinaVoodoo, that photo's a crack-up. Did you subtly shade around that bird's bill where it's pinching the baby rodent? Scary good work- you could likely moonlight remuneratively for tabloids. I was pretty tired last night. Just noticed some beaver sign in our neighborhood park, which is next to a wetland area: a 4" willow trunk neatly chewed in half, w both sides chiseled to points like big hand-whittled pencils. Sure enough, at the nearest access to the marsh there are big smeared, froggy-looking tracks in the muddy bank- as though the Creature from the Black Lagoon had hauled-out there. I guess a fairly common sight in much of Canada.
Regards, ifyougotem
 

Brown Thumb

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This cat stalking deer waiting for them to come over the rockrow from the cornfield.
It Sat there for over a hr. That well is over 4 ft tall in the background.
It then disappeared into the rockrow. Can you find it? I see can it.
It sat in the rockrow down from there at another deer path. I never saw it there.
I have never heard a deer scream so loud in my life. Out of the corner of my eye I see the cat on a large doe running out of the rock row into the cornfield.
That deer screamed bloody murder over 10 acres until she went down.
I carry a flashlight to the garage from now on.
 

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deluxestogie

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That is an impressive "cat".

BT_cat.jpg


Bob
 

deluxestogie

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Mice living with humans the longest found to be the best at problem-solving.
Bob
 

Knucklehead

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Mice living with humans the longest found to be the best at problem-solving.
Bob

Did you notice the opportunity that was missed? The study failed to note whether human problem solving increased or decreased.
 
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