Whole Leaf Tobacco

Sun cured versus Air Cured Burley

ringanator

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do they not use citric acid as a case on flue cure virgina type tobacco?? if so that would indicate to me that they are trying to reduce the alkalinity? but thats just a guess
 

ChinaVoodoo

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Both extremes are unpleasant. This is a good reference for this discussion. https://www.google.ca/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://www.leffingwell.com/download/Leffingwell%20-%20Tobacco%20production%20chemistry%20and%20technology.pdf&ved=0ahUKEwjtzo-VsZ7JAhVTfogKHcR0DH0QFggfMAA&usg=AFQjCNH9Ayv75Zpy4bLA3u0kjLKOpDfAMQ&sig2=6OmxvhM9IUjSofi1wLT8XA
Look at the section titled:
SENSORY ROLE OF CARBOHYDRATES,
AMMONIA AND NICOTINE- PH OF
TOBACCO SMOKE

It shows that as you smoke a pure Burley blend, it becomes increasingly alkaline; whereas with flue cured, it increases in acidity as you smoke.
 

Smokin Harley

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I retract my theory of alkalinity causing tongue bite...I looked it up in many places as I should have before answering .
I found the most likely cause of tongue bite are 2 things...One being that the tobacco is too moist ,causing steam which in turn burns the tongue and secondly if the bowl is packed too tightly .
 

Smokin Harley

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do they not use citric acid as a case on flue cure virgina type tobacco?? if so that would indicate to me that they are trying to reduce the alkalinity? but thats just a guess
I'm going to take a guess that citric acid does for the casing/flavorings in tobacco as they do in a food type recipe , it accentuates the flavors or makes them go farther .
My Ex-brother in law used to raise bees and during his flavored honey attempts found that adding citric acid to the honey made the flavorings go quite a bit farther than had he flavored it without using citric acid. He made a lot of cinnamon honey and it sold like crazy during the winter for adding to teas. At first he kept adding cinnamon extract and even though it smelled like cinnamon it tasted flat as if he had added none. Once the citric acid was added just a dab of flavoring did the trick and then it was like eating cinnamon red hots.
 

Alpine

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It was my understanding that citric acid was added to lower the Ph so that nicotine could be absorbed by inhaling instead by being adsorbed by the mouth mucosae... I was wondering in the last few days how much citric acid should be added (by the pound or kilogram) to have that nic kick in my cigs... Not even rusticas seem to add that "throat hit" that unfiltered Camels gave me in the late 80's...
Pier
 

ChinaVoodoo

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It was my understanding that citric acid was added to lower the Ph so that nicotine could be absorbed by inhaling instead by being adsorbed by the mouth mucosae... I was wondering in the last few days how much citric acid should be added (by the pound or kilogram) to have that nic kick in my cigs... Not even rusticas seem to add that "throat hit" that unfiltered Camels gave me in the late 80's...
Pier
Alkaline ie higher pH is responsible for making nicotine more accessible. Citric acid is used to smooth out Burley and higher pH tobaccos. I added 5g of citric acid and 15g sugar to a plug made from cigar rolling scrap and it now smokes nicely in a pipe.
 

deluxestogie

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Interesting. Citric acid and heat are used in solution to convert table sugar into fructose (e.g. in making jams and jellies).

Bob
 

Jitterbugdude

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In the cigarette smoking world there is something called "Impact" otherwise known has "throat hit". Many smokers seek various levels of it. Acids and sugars are added to Burley probably more for it's ability to lower throat hit than for increasing absorption from inhaling.
 

nystuga

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this is an old thread, but I tried to find out info about acid vs. alkaline effects on tonque and found this forum (link below). This guy explains it just the opposite what I have thought.
He explains that it's burleys and other low sugar content topacco what makes you feel tonque bite... Can you explain this to me? #Bob!!
Check this thread: https://christianpipesmokers.net/viewtopic.php?t=12184
 

deluxestogie

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Of course, either very high pH or very low pH will irritate (and can entirely dissolve) the tongue. Within the ranges found in smoking tobacco, increased acidity (lower pH) causes bite on the tip of the tongue, whereas increased alkalinity (higher pH) causes a similar sensation toward the back of the tongue.

Bob
 
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