Whole Leaf Tobacco

Pure Tobacco Pipe Blends You Can Make

Traveling Piper

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 31, 2019
Messages
120
Points
28
Location
Andalusia, Al
I felt inclined to share this one. It’s a blend I’d like to take on a spring fishing trip because it is downright pleasant and fun to smoke. It’s super simple because thats how my blending has to be right now.

75% Oriental (used WLT Prilep)
25% Ligero Cigar (used WLT Nicaraguan Habano Ligero)

After smoking a bowl of the Prilep, it was nice— but lacked vigour and nicotine. China had told me that cigar leaf tends to round out flavours for him. So, thought I’d try an “OrGar”. It’s simple and good—like a day on the water should be.

I brought the leaf into case just enough to rough chop and did just that. I shook the ingredients and allowed them to marry a couple days.
The smoke is really smooth and has a certain luxury to it. Smelling the bowl as it burns is intoxicating to me. There’s no nose burn and the blend is very easy on the tongue. The Orientals are accentuated here and the Prilep loses alot of it’s earthiness while surrendering to a more floral bouquet (than when smoked alone). I also found it much sweeter than when smoked solo. To me, the blend isn’t funky or rank from the Ligero. The cigar leaf seems to give a peppery aspect and is there just playing the cello—very well. Also, the Nicaraguan brings the perfect amount of Nic to the blend.
I plan to press some of this in a larger quantity to really see what it really has to offer.

All suggestions are welcomed!

If I were to suggest a name, it would be Shellcracker Blend.

5F1C738D-236C-412D-B327-66C77BA5B2D4.jpeg
 

Youn

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 4, 2017
Messages
247
Points
43
Location
France (Auvergne)
I felt inclined to share this one. It’s a blend I’d like to take on a spring fishing trip because it is downright pleasant and fun to smoke. It’s super simple because thats how my blending has to be right now.

75% Oriental (used WLT Prilep)
25% Ligero Cigar (used WLT Nicaraguan Habano Ligero)

After smoking a bowl of the Prilep, it was nice— but lacked vigour and nicotine. China had told me that cigar leaf tends to round out flavours for him. So, thought I’d try an “OrGar”. It’s simple and good—like a day on the water should be.

I brought the leaf into case just enough to rough chop and did just that. I shook the ingredients and allowed them to marry a couple days.
The smoke is really smooth and has a certain luxury to it. Smelling the bowl as it burns is intoxicating to me. There’s no nose burn and the blend is very easy on the tongue. The Orientals are accentuated here and the Prilep loses alot of it’s earthiness while surrendering to a more floral bouquet (than when smoked alone). I also found it much sweeter than when smoked solo. To me, the blend isn’t funky or rank from the Ligero. The cigar leaf seems to give a peppery aspect and is there just playing the cello—very well. Also, the Nicaraguan brings the perfect amount of Nic to the blend.
I plan to press some of this in a larger quantity to really see what it really has to offer.

All suggestions are welcomed!

If I were to suggest a name, it would be Shellcracker Blend.

View attachment 27177
Yeah! I have these ingredients in stock, I'll give it a try! Thanks.
I like the name too :)
 

deluxestogie

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
May 25, 2011
Messages
14,772
Points
113
Location
near Blacksburg, VA
Zeus



This is a rich English/American style Balkan. The WLT Double Bright Virginia contributes a light though distinctive flue-cured taste, without the edgier acidity of VA Bright. The combination of Burley Red tips and Maryland Cavendish cranks up the nicotine to medium-full, and rounds-out the flavor profile. Despite one quarter of the blend being Latakia, its smoky-incense taste and aroma seem to remain in the background.

The ancient Roman pantheon consisted of bunches of gods and goddesses and demi-gods, etc., with Jupiter as the head honcho. Since Zeus was the supreme god of the even more ancient Greek pantheon, the Romans naturally decided that Zeus had actually been Jupiter all along.



Zeus
  • Virginia Double Bright 37.5% (6 of 16 parts)
  • Burley Red Tip 25% (4 of 16 parts)
  • Maryland Cavendish 12.5% (2 of 16 parts)
  • Latakia 25% (4 of 16 parts)
Download 3.5 inch label as pdf.

Bob
 

GreenDragon

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2018
Messages
779
Points
93
Location
Austin, TX
Bob, when I saw that picture yesterday I thought it would be perfect featured on a deluxestogie custom blend label - and I was right :)

Continuing the theme, how about a blend for Curiosity; a beautiful bold brown blend with bursts of bellicosity. Thinking maybe burley and dark fired???

curiosity-gale-crater-1920x1200.jpg
 

GreenDragon

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2018
Messages
779
Points
93
Location
Austin, TX
In honor of today’s fire-hot thread on Metric vs Imperial measurements, as a good scientist I will share my recipe in grams. I give you Curiosity:

8g Burley
5g Va Red
5g Fire Cured (light)
4g Perique

This is lovely, and I liken it to a nice Cabernet. I’ve decided I really like Burley blends for their depth of flavor. This is great on its own, but I think it would be good to add to aromatics to give them some extra flavor. I think my next batch I’ll add a pinch (1g) of Va Bright Leaf to add a touch more acid.

For this blend I had hoped to make a cube cut, so I used whole leaf and made a thin stack that I pressed for 48 hrs like I did for my cube cut burley. I found out that apparently burley only sticks to burley (no glue aka sugars were used to stick it together). So I made a fine ribbon cut. Still I am happy with the result.

1F4982CE-F178-4081-B68F-C72C4F37968B.jpeg
 

deluxestogie

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
May 25, 2011
Messages
14,772
Points
113
Location
near Blacksburg, VA
It's been nearly 48 hours, and nobody has yet commented on the fact that Curiosity is roving over a tobacco leaf. I'm disheartened.


Tobacco Curiosity vs. Mars Curiosity.

Notice how I used the leaf stem as the rover's wheel track? I even maintained the same horizon. And those little cutouts in the wheels? And the matched shadow? Oh, and the colors...the trim color is taken from the rover wheels, and the accent and title color from the real Martian atmosphere.

Seriously, I believe that no one noticed the bit of humor.

Bob
 

burge

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 11, 2014
Messages
1,026
Points
63
Location
Alberta
If it had a super high nicotine level you could call it the Steam Roller
 

GreenDragon

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2018
Messages
779
Points
93
Location
Austin, TX
LOL you did too good a job photoshopping that! I wondered why you used a different picture, but then.... Squirrel!
 

deluxestogie

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
May 25, 2011
Messages
14,772
Points
113
Location
near Blacksburg, VA

I borrowed this lovely illustration from the 1882 title page of Grimm's Tales, translated from the German and illustrated by Crane and Crane, respectively.
Thanks, Cranes. (Notice the crane in the lower right with a writing implement held in its foot, above a book with two latches on its cover.)


In the old American railway system, a caboose was often tagged onto the end of a train, and served as a kitchen and sleeping quarter for the railroad employees on board (like a staff "break room").



The Red Train blend consists of red, red, red, and red. It is half Cavendish. Red Caboose is similar, also with half Cavendish, but with a nice measure of cigar leaf tagged onto the end, displacing some of the Virginia Red.

Red Train
  • Virginia Red Cavendish 25% (4 parts per 16)
  • Burley Red Tips Cavendish 25% (4 parts per 16)
  • Virginia Red 37.5% (6 parts per 16)
  • Burley Red Tips 12.5% (2 parts per 16)
Red Caboose
  • Virginia Red Cavendish 25% (4 parts per 16)
  • Burley Red Tips Cavendish 25% (4 parts per 16)
  • Virginia Red 25% (4 parts per 16)
  • Burley Red Tips 12.5% (2 parts per 16)
  • Long Red (or Pennsylvania Red) 12.5% (2 parts per 16)
Download blend labels for Red Train and Red Caboose as 3.5" pdf.

During the late 1920s and into the 1940s, many old, decommissioned railroad passenger cars were planted in cities and along highways, and converted into restaurants, known as "diners", after the dining cars of the railroads. By the 1940s these were often no longer old rail cars, but prefabricated for delivery on site, like a mobile home. So even these later diners looked like rail cars. (Perhaps all those squeaky train wheels encouraged diners to always serve greasy food--so troublesome to adequately wash off the spoons.) Today, real diners have pretty much been displaced by fast-food burger franchises, though some restaurant chains still cling to the diner motif (e.g. Waffle House).

Cabooses (the sight of which was my sole motivation for patiently watching every long, slow freight train when I was a child in the 1950s) have mostly vanished from the rails, but still show up occasionally as diners or as mini-motels, or even as a backyard man cave. Unlike the real diners of yesteryear, converted cabooses today charge boutique prices for their kale and tofu.

And on the subject of long trains, Long Red is really long (typically over 30"). It's a touch less intense than Pennsylvania Red, and not as sweet as Pennsylvania Seedleaf (like Lancaster). It provides a deep, leathery, woody note, without the earthiness and "cigar smell" of Habano types. (In making this Red Caboose blend, I used unkilned Long Red grown in the 2016 season.)


From 2015.

Bob
 

deluxestogie

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
May 25, 2011
Messages
14,772
Points
113
Location
near Blacksburg, VA


Sunday dinner is over. Kick back with your favorite pipe and an uncomplicated, relaxing blend that demands nothing. No analysis. No revelations or delicate interplay of contrasting components.

This burley / Virginia pipe blend uses simple ingredients in a simple 5:3 ratio. It may look like a typical, cigarette blend, but by using Burley Red Tips, rather than the more common, lower leaf, the body is richer and the flavor profile more complex. I've left it with a slight flue-cured edge.



Sunday Afternoon
  • Virginia Bright 62.5% (10 parts per 16)
  • Burley Red Tip 37.5% (6 parts per 16)
Download the 3.5" pdf of the label.

Bob
 

deluxestogie

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
May 25, 2011
Messages
14,772
Points
113
Location
near Blacksburg, VA
Just Walking Home

After walking on a lovely day, that last stretch is the most relaxed, least stressful part. My spirit has been scrubbed of little worries. Yes, the weather held. I no longer even have to consider how far to walk, when to turn back, or whether I will encounter other people or wildlife. I'm just walking home.



I started this blend with some fire-cured Shirazi, which I made 8 years ago. It was fired two or three times a day for about 2 weeks, using my steel trash can smoke chamber nested on top of a Brinkmann smoker. The woods used were oak, apple, maple, and probably some other minor woods that I've forgotten. [I did this with a pan of water between the low fire at the bottom and the can with the tobacco on top, keeping the temp of the upper chamber below about 120°F. I now believe that, with careful minding of the fire, the water pan is not necessary, unless it is uncured, green leaf, or newly color-cured leaf.] The resulting fire-cured Shirazi ranges from medium to deep brown.

My guess is that the particular Oriental variety that is fire-cured will have little impact on the final result. By contrast, if you use Kentucky fire-cured, you may need to significantly reduce the proportion of fire-cured in the blend, since its nicotine will be much higher.



Pouch aroma is subdued, slightly fruity (from the Perique), and offers just a hint of the fire-cured. The blend lights easily, and burns well. The fire-cured Shirazi gives it a noticeable campfire character, once it is lit, but the aromas are rich and complex. It's smooth, with a slight flue-cured edge. Nicotine is mild to medium. The smokiness is not as intense as with a Latakia blend, and way milder than with Kentucky fire-cured.

Just Walking Home
  • Fire-cured Oriental 31.25% (5 parts per 16)
  • Virginia Double Bright 31.25% (5 parts per 16)
  • Burley Red Tip Cavendish 18.75% (3 parts per 16)
  • Perique 12.5% (2 parts per 16)
  • Basma 6.25% (1 part per 16)
Download the 3.5" label as a pdf.

Bob
 
Top