Whole Leaf Tobacco

Comparing the morphology of Izmir Ozbas, Smyrna #9 and Xanthi Yaka 18A

Aaron

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#21
Building a sun curing equipment is easy but procedure itself is really very tricky. I think it's time to start a new thread on sun-curing part of the forum so we may discuss it in detail there.
I look forward to reading the thread. Sun curing is something I'd like to try also.
 

Knucklehead

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#22
Building a sun curing equipment is easy but procedure itself is really very tricky. I think it's time to start a new thread on sun-curing part of the forum so we may discuss it in detail there.
That would be very helpful, thank you. (Except the NZlanders are saying "WTF" about now. LOL)
Was I right, no fertilizer?
 

rainmax

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#23
Yes, me to. Sun curing. I take my tobacco with be on the beach and we will cure together.
Here in Ljubljana I live in north side of castle and not enough to sun cure. Dixi shade will grow fast I believe.
 

Fisherman

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#24
"Yaka" refers to orientals grown on the slopes of hills or mountains,
specifically in the Black Sea region.

Xanthi is a type of oriental, the best of which are collectively known as
Basma (which actually refers to the pressing method of baling used on the
best grades).

From "Aromatic or Oriental Tobaccos", Frederick A. Wolf, Duke Press 1962.
An interesting read.
==============================
Xanthi is a tobacco market in Greece and the locally produced tobacco
sold there is called Xanthi as well. It is a Basma type oriental as
are all Macedonian varieties. Yaka is grown in the same region of
GReece and also over the border in Bulgaria.
http://www.bulgartabac.bg/l_tradition.html
It is quite possible they are buying a blend of the two, or they are
distinguishing between the two Yaka varieties. A search of
http://www.yapraktutun.gov.tr/satis...acteries/varieties_and_their_characterist.htm
Does not show Yaka, only Yala. Easy to confuse. While the term Basma
originally refered to a way of baling the leaf by farmers, it now
refers to a family of oriental tobaccos which share certain chemical
chrateristics. Izmir/smyrna is superficially similar but is chemically
distinct.
===============================

Yaka is also grown in Macedonia (the country). Anceint Macedonia is
plit into three states: Macedonia, Bulgaria and Greece. Yaka is their
second largest tobacco crop. I suspect xanthi yaka refers to greecian
yaka.

====================================


From discussion at a cigar forum @ http://www.mombu.com/cigars/pipes-a...atakia-flake-what-is-xanthi-yaka-2197903.html

Only one person offered source as mentioned above.
 

Planter

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#25
Tom, I'll have to go thru my notes because I grew 17 varieties this year but I can say this about the "Lebanese" seeds- the field dryed mud lugs tasted just like BSS-Maden. They did not grow as tall as Bursa but they were a little taller than Xanthi Yaka. I was thinking the same thing about it being as close to a pure Turkish variety as possible. I plan to keep growing it for a few years to see if it changes in anyway.
Randy B
Can you comment on the aged / kilned leaf by now? How does that compare to Samsun-Maden?
 

JessicaNicot

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#28
Hi Bob. I read thru this thread and I just wanted to make some notes. the "ruffle" you described is called the auricle. its actually a highly variable trait, ranging from not really present to a big ruffle to some that have leaf bases which run down the stalk possibly connecting two leaves.

also, there are numerous types of trichomes (leaf hairs) and not all of them make exudates (residues). in fact, there are a couple of tobacco varieties that are known to not make any exudates because they lack secreting trichomes. as far as how that impacts flavor, I can't say, but apparently these smaller gland-less trichomes are associated with insect resistance in tobacco.
 

deluxestogie

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#29
Jessica,
Thank you. I did stumble into the term, auricle, a couple of years after I began recording descriptions of the leaf ruffle. I think "ruffle" is more descriptive than "ear," but will try to mend my ways.

With regard to the trichomes, I've noticed that dense trichomes that produce a sticky surface on the leaf seem to harbor larger burial grounds of tiny, entrapped insects. But aphids don't seem to mind.

Bob
 

JessicaNicot

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#30
With regard to the trichomes, I've noticed that dense trichomes that produce a sticky surface on the leaf seem to harbor larger burial grounds of tiny, entrapped insects. But aphids don't seem to mind.
well I was sitting in on a random seminar one day and learned that aphids undergo a lot of molting to into specialized forms (like caterpillars turning into moths), so its possible what you were seeing matted up were aphid molts. but I don't claim to be an entomologist.
 
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#31
If we add a comparison of Izmir Ozbas (from western Turkey) with Xanthi Yaka #18A , also known as Yenidje leaf, (from what is now Greece) the two are far more similar in morphology than Izmir Ozbas is to Smyrna #9. Xanthi Yaka (distinguished from Xanthi Djebel, which is grown at higher elevations in the Rhodope mountain range above the town of Xanthi) lacks the upturned rim on the leaves, and is less pubescent than Izmir Ozbas, but it is of similar size and equally rugose. Xanthi Yaka #18A's ruffle is less well defined than that of Izmir Ozbas.
Bob
Reviving another old thread. I've been reading through the various forums and topics so I can learn as much as I can. I have a question regarding Xanthi Yaka 18a and Yenidje: Are these two actually the same? I have a pack of Yenidje seeds I got from Sustainable Seed Co. and as far as I know, they get their seeds from Skychaser. Your descriptions of it compared to Izmir Ozbas and Smyrna #9 have piqued my interest in growing it, so it would be nice to know if I already have it.

-Tom
 

deluxestogie

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#32
I don't know the actual source, in Greece, from which the currently available "Yenidje" variety seed was obtained. What does its name mean? Even if it was produced within Giannitsa (Yenidje, Γιαννιτσά), where did those folks get it? After the fame of Yenidje leaf had spread, tobacco production in that area ceased entirely--due to a natural disaster, and was apparently moved up-slope to the region surrounding Xanthi. This was all well before the advent of seed banks, so I don't know what that Yenidje might be. I'm afraid I can't answer your question.

Bob
 
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#33
Understood.

Where did you obtain your 18a seed? I see a vendor in UK (UK Tobacco Seeds) selling it by name, but I'm not sure of their credibility.

Any experience with them?
 

deluxestogie

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#34
My Xanthi-Yaka #18A came directly from ARS-GRIN, back when that was still possible. Likely most Xanthi-Yaka would give similar results. The "Yaka" qualifier is assumed for most "Xanthi", and indicates the Xanthi grown on the lower slopes, in contrast to Xanthi-Djebel, from the higher altitudes above the town of Xanthi. Check with @skychaser at Northwood Seeds, to see if he has Xanthi-Yaka #18A in his inventory.

Bob
 
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