Whole Leaf Tobacco

Pics of your sticks!! 2021

MarcL

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7 X 54 from the center, Cibao Criollo 98 Ligero , Cibao Corojo Viso and Cibao Vuelta Abajo Seco fillers. CV PA and CV Corojo Oscuro binders with, Olor wrappers.

https://i.imgur.com/DLF7y4a.jpg
 

Jtravis

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I took a draw after this photo and the ash fell right on my lap. Should have seen that coming.

Nothing new...or creative here:

Nic seco, viso & ligero
Nic Seco Binder
San Andres Wrapper

It would probably do me some good to throw something a little different into this blend. I’m just a lazy purist.1DF6C425-09C5-4906-8AB8-DD09F33D9471.jpeg
 

willgodwin

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Jun 18, 2020
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These 4 seem like it's the first batch I've gotten a good consistent bunch along the cigar and with medium firm draw. PHEW. I wasn't quite grasping the concept of how tight (or not tight) to bind the bunch and then what work to let the mold do. I watched every video, even bought Bobalu's course ("just roll the bunch in the binder like a cannoli or anything else..." LOL) Just wasn't gettin it. Took a break from molds and did a bunch of newspaper molds for a few weeks and thought I would never return to the classic molds again; every draw on every cigar was just about perfect. But back at it again. I think using the newspaper molds helped my brain in some way realize what and how the mold functions as I roll cigars. Seeing Bob squeeze his bunch before binding really helped me to; I can feel where the soft spots might be, and of course I got Bliss runnin' on repeat and Robert's voice rising in my ears... :) Cheers!IMG_8173.jpegIMG_8175.jpegIMG_8170.jpeg
 

MarcL

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These 4 seem like it's the first batch I've gotten a good consistent bunch along the cigar and with medium firm draw. PHEW. I wasn't quite grasping the concept of how tight (or not tight) to bind the bunch and then what work to let the mold do. I watched every video, even bought Bobalu's course ("just roll the bunch in the binder like a cannoli or anything else..." LOL) Just wasn't gettin it. Took a break from molds and did a bunch of newspaper molds for a few weeks and thought I would never return to the classic molds again; every draw on every cigar was just about perfect. But back at it again. I think using the newspaper molds helped my brain in some way realize what and how the mold functions as I roll cigars. Seeing Bob squeeze his bunch before binding really helped me to; I can feel where the soft spots might be, and of course I got Bliss runnin' on repeat and Robert's voice rising in my ears... :) Cheers!View attachment 38204View attachment 38205View attachment 38206
Nice! and, I see what you did with the capping. Clean.
 

Snowblithe

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This is the last of my last year’s cigars. I’m not sure what is in it and it has an utterly ethereal draw (read loose and airy, not heavenly) but it tastes pretty good and peppery. 64+ gauge so it’s of @deluxestogie proportions. I will need to make more soon. I’m thinking some cheroots and some San Andreas blends, but we’ll see. 37FF3128-A797-49C4-9897-2C5AFA1D6AA6.jpeg
 

deluxestogie

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Garden20210814_5985_cigar_peppery_700.jpg


For the first time ever, I will describe a cigar as "peppery". It's not about the tobacco. After cutting up a bunch of Basque Peppers, I rinsed my hands, then rolled this cigar. After a few more chores, I thought it might be a good idea to wash my hands with soap and water, which I did.

On placing this cigar into my mouth to light it, my lips began to burn. It was like smoking a cayenne pepper.

Bob
 

FrostD

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Dec 29, 2020
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Enjoyment time! Cigar #76 I rolled up. Really good flavors all the way through. Need to roll up more of this one and let them sit.

#76
Wrapper date: 2/4/21
Bound date: 2/3/21
Filler style: Entubado

Molded w/ 9x52 round cap mold. Procured from WLT

Wrapper: WLT Habano 2000k

Binder: WLT Sumatra

Filler:
2/5 WLT Nicaragua Condega Seco 2014 (out of stock now. Try any WLT Condega Seco to replace)

1/5 WLT Dominican Criollo ‘98 Seco

1/5 WLT T-13 Viso- Just Uber good in any blend

1/5 WLT CV Corojo Ligero 2006
 

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Snowblithe

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What consists on a Toscano facsimile? What draws you to that blend @Snowblithe ?
They were always my favourite commercial cigar for their economy, strength and flavour, to answer your second question.
As to what it is, the commercial ones are a blend of fire cured tobaccos from Kentucky and Italy, the latter being their origin. I dissected one and found that the filler is a melange of long and short leaf with a single leaf that serves as both wrapper and binder. My understanding is that they are only compromised of fire cured tobacco but I use mostly long and short cigar ‘scraps’ with a few strips of fire cured throughout the filler as the stuff from WLT is to potent for a puro, at least to my constitution. I do bind them ‘authentically’ with one leaf and use a shed-load of glue on the whole seam. It’s tricky and I’m still figuring it out, but I’ve managed to make them smokable more often than not… they’re made so they can be cut in half or smoked from either end without unraveling. They’re called cheroots.
 
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