Whole Leaf Tobacco

Pics of your sticks!!

MarcL

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2013
Messages
2,967
Points
113
Location
Central Maryland
Yeah, I get myself in trouble. its a continuation of last weeks blend w/o the t-13 and Candela. I needed to pull a fresh San Vic out so, it made it as the replacement. Now I have nothing prepped. Lets see how long this lasts.
 

Chacocii

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 30, 2016
Messages
45
Points
18
Location
Tampa
27566messed around with some wrappers today. First try on barber poles. Could be better but I'm happy with these for my first 3 tries. I'm wondering if they will taste different from one another based on how much of each wrapper is exposed.
 
Joined
May 3, 2019
Messages
5
Points
3
Location
Edmonton, Alberta
My latest roll. Question, it was suggested to me that after having finished my smokes (wrapped and capped) to roll them up in a shiny magazine page and let them rest for a few days (which is what I have done with these babies) to get better shine. Seems to work very well, the question is, how or why does this improve the shine on a newly rolled cigar?E2BCF181-3958-4E3D-86E0-C2ACD076415A.jpeg5497BC27-D601-4CB7-A310-43F89E11E524.jpeg
 

deluxestogie

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
May 25, 2011
Messages
13,838
Points
113
Location
near Blacksburg, VA
Your cigars look lovely.

it was suggested to me...
The finish on different paper surfaces is produced using clays of varying consistencies, rolled out under pressure. What heavy metals are in your particular shiny magazine paper? [I'm not trying to be snarky, but I would always be skeptical of secret tips.]

The natural sheen on a finished cigar comes from the wrapper variety, as well as uniform tension on the leaf during wrapping. My home grown top leaf is naturally a dull, dark maduro. If I apply it well as a wrapper, it exhibits a glorious sheen from some varieties, yet is still dull with others.

Bob
 

MarcL

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2013
Messages
2,967
Points
113
Location
Central Maryland
.. roll them up in a shiny magazine page and let them rest for a few days (which is what I have done with these babies) to get better shine. Seems to work very well, the question is, how or why does this improve the shine on a newly rolled cigar?
I have not heard of doing this but, if it works well, that's good. I agree with Bob. Its the oils in the leaf. Some (shade/dryer) will not. If you take a leaf that is damp and, from the inside, press your finger up into it the oils come to the surface. Its the stretching. I've heard that a number of times and it works for me.
 
Joined
May 3, 2019
Messages
5
Points
3
Location
Edmonton, Alberta
Your cigars look lovely.

The finish on different paper surfaces is produced using clays of varying consistencies, rolled out under pressure. What heavy metals are in your particular shiny magazine paper? [I'm not trying to be snarky, but I would always be skeptical of secret tips.]
Bob
Thanks for the compliment. I knew that paper shininess is from clays or added polymers but someone pointed out to me in another forum that possibly by rolling it in paper during the drying process could increase the smoothness of the wrapper therefore adding some shininess somehow. Will try to wrap only one half of a finished cigar on my next roll just to see if it is me who is so eager to see mirror perfect smokes that It makes me loose my objectivity lol.
 

deluxestogie

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
May 25, 2011
Messages
13,838
Points
113
Location
near Blacksburg, VA


My home-grown Havana 322 is funny stuff. Each time I grow it, and finish kilning and aging it, I grumble to myself that it's not all that great. But then, after it's been just sitting for another 6 to 9 months, something quite suddenly happens. It takes on a richer, more interesting aroma. It's never full-bodied, but becomes delicious.

Havana 322 is an American derivative Habano that is more resistant to a bunch of viruses, etc., than other American "numbered" Havana tobaccos. It's productivity is good. I've grown it twice now (last time in 2017). Both times it was unimpressive, until it reached its magic age.

This cigar, with its edgy CT wrapper and Indonesian binder, closely resembles the original Dominican Montecristo cigars in aroma, taste, and strength. Yummy and mellow.

Bob
 

Rectifier

Active Member
Joined
Sep 27, 2016
Messages
39
Points
8
Location
Saskatchewan, Canada
Well here are my first hand rolls! They are not the best cigars I've ever seen but honestly they came out far better than I expected.
As advised I went small for my first tries. They are 5.5" Petit Coronas with pigtail caps as demonstrated in this video:
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=djemTOpQwY4
and this method definitely produces a nice square cigar that is even all the way down.

Pigtails seemed like an easy way to cap off my first cigars rather than fussing with a triple cap. In the end, you are just going to smoke it, right?

IMG_20190616_164906.jpg
IMG_20190616_164940.jpg
They are from the WLT Melodioso Cremosa blend.

The smaller one only has seco as filler, as I drew a large leaf of seco and just decided to use the whole thing as filler. Wasn't sure if I could fit the ligero in as well.
The second fatter one I had a smaller seco leaf so I tossed the ligero in there too and it honestly looks like a better cigar. Guess the practice is paying off already :)

Only thing about these is they feel a little damp to smoke, probably because the wrapper is still damp. So I threw them in a glasslock by themselves to equalize humidity between the moist wrapper/binder and dry filler, and after I put my daughter to bed tonight I think I will check to see if I can fire one up!
 
Top